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National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

 

Annual Meeting of the Superfund Research Program: Emerging Issues, Emerging Progress

November 2-5, 2009

 

Roone Arledge Auditorium
Alfred Lerner Hall
Columbia University
2920 Broadway
New York, NY

Meeting Summary

Over 300 Superfund grantees, researchers, partners, post-doctoral fellows and graduate students gathered for the NIEHS Superfund Research and Training Program annual meeting, held November 2-5, 2009 at Columbia University in New York, NY. The theme of this meeting was "Emerging Issues, Emerging Progress”.

The overall goals of the meeting were to discuss the emerging issues within the SRP by identifying emerging technologies and their applications to understanding and mitigating the risks of hazardous waste sites. Together, these advances will facilitate more accurate assessments of exposure and human health risks to Superfund chemicals. A key aspect of the meeting was the application of these research developments to the evaluation of real-world issues, sites, and situations. Four plenary sessions highlighted student and researcher/post-doc advances in environmental health. Presentations focused on research advances in fate, transport and remediation; emerging research methodologies; toxic effects of Superfund chemicals; and exposure, risk, and epidemiology.

Two keynote speakers were featured at the meeting. On Tuesday, Dr. Stephen Safe, Texas A&M University, shared the late Dr. K.C. Donnelly’s scientific career and achievements with meeting attendees. K.C.’s involvement in the SRP and his interest and concern for people and public health issues will have a lasting impact on his colleagues, friends, and family. On Wednesday, George Pavlou, Acting Regional Administrator of Region 2 of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), gave a summary of the recent work and advances in the Hudson River Superfund site. Pavlou’s presentation, “Update on the Hudson River Remediation,” included photos of the cleanup effort and outlined several remediation tactics under consideration by the EPA.

Kathleen Radloff was the recipient of the 12th Annual Karen Wetterhahn Memorial Award. She presented her research, "How Arsenic Mobility Influences Safe Drinking Water Options in Bangladesh” on Wednesday. A student poster session was held on Tuesday evening. Two students were honored for their presentation efforts. Shawn Wnek (“Exposure of a human bladder cell line to short-term, low-level monomethylarsonous acid produced critical and irreversible events resulting in malignant transformation”,University of Arizona, A. J. Gandolfi, Advisor) and Xin Hu (“Time course of PCB congener uptake and elimination in rat tissue after inhalation exposure to PCB mixtures”, University of Iowa, P.S. Thorne, Advisor) each received a cash prize of $250 for the outstanding presentation of their research efforts.

Sponsored by

  • National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences - Superfund Research Program
  • Columbia University

Additional Information

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