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Your Environment. Your Health.

Temperature explains broad patterns of Ross River virus transmission

Climate Change and Human Health Literature Portal

Shocket MS, Ryan SJ, Mordecai EA
2018
eLife. 7: e37762

Thermal biology predicts that vector-borne disease transmission peaks at intermediate temperatures and declines at high and low temperatures. However, thermal optima and limits remain unknown for most vector-borne pathogens. We built a mechanistic model for the thermal response of Ross River virus, an important mosquito-borne pathogen in Australia, Pacific Islands, and potentially at risk of emerging worldwide. Transmission peaks at moderate temperatures (26.4 degrees C) and declines to zero at thermal limits (17.0 and 31.5 degrees C). The model accurately predicts that transmission is year-round endemic in the tropics but seasonal in temperate areas, resulting in the nationwide seasonal peak in human cases. Climate warming will likely increase transmission in temperate areas (where most Australians live) but decrease transmission in tropical areas where mean temperatures are already near the thermal optimum. These results illustrate the importance of nonlinear models for inferring the role of temperature in disease dynamics and predicting responses to climate change.

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Resource Description

  • Ecosystem Change, Seasonality, Temperature
    • Temperature: Heat
  • Temperate, Tropical
  • Non-United States
    • Non-United States: Australasia
  • Infectious Disease
    • Infectious Disease: Vectorborne Disease
      • Vectorborne Disease: Mosquito-borne Disease
        • Mosquito-borne Disease: Ross River Virus
  • Research Article
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