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2009

Exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) of 'some concern' for children's health

Image of BPA Can

In 2009, NIEHS-funded researchers studying bisphenol A, or BPA, met at NIEHS with other scientists from academia and government who were already studying the chemical for potential public health risks. The chemical, one among a group known as endocrine disruptors, is found in plastics such as food containers, water bottles, and baby bottles. It has been present in hard plastic bottles and metal-based food and beverage cans since the 1960s.

 

NIEHS announced plans to invest approximately $30 million on BPA research over two years. In 2008, the National Toxicology Program concluded that BPA is of "some concern" for effects on development of the prostate gland and brain, and for behavioral effects in fetuses, infants, and children. The NTP’s final report is part of a larger review of scientific literature on current human exposures to BPA, and includes public and peer review comments.


Tags: National Toxicology Program, children's health


Citation:

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, NTP (National Toxicology Program), CERHR (Center for the Evaluation of Risks to Human Reproduction). 2000. NTP-CERHR Monograph on the Potential Human Reproductive and Developmental Effects of Bisphenol A. NIH (National Institutes of Health) Publication No. 08-5994. [PDF]


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