Skip Navigation
U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Dot gov

The .gov means it’s official.
Federal government websites often end in .gov or .mil. Before sharing sensitive information, make sure you’re on a federal government site.

Https

The site is secure.
The https:// ensures that you are connecting to the official website and that any information you provide is encrypted and transmitted securely.

Internet Explorer is no longer a supported browser.

This website may not display properly with Internet Explorer. For the best experience, please use a more recent browser such as the latest versions of Google Chrome, Microsoft Edge, and/or Mozilla Firefox. Thank you.

COVID-19 is an emerging, rapidly evolving situation.

Get the latest public health information from CDC. Get the latest research information from NIH.

Your Environment. Your Health.

Search

You are now searching on tag Smoking ‹‹ Main Highlights ››
Date
Title

2002

Air pollution increases risk of lung cancer, heart disease

Smog at rush hour

NIEHS-funded researchers demonstrated that years of exposure to high concentrations of tiny particles of soot and dust from cars, power plants, and factories can increase a person's risk of dying from lung cancer and heart disease to a level that is comparable to the risk associated with prolonged exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke.

Full Highlight: Air pollution increases risk of lung cancer, heart disease

Tags: air, lung, smoking

1999

Smoking alters youthful DNA to increase lung cancer later in life

cigarette smoke

Early smoking may alter a young person's DNA, possibly increasing the risk of lung cancer years later, even after the smoker quits, researchers found.

Full Highlight: Smoking alters youthful DNA to increase lung cancer later in life

Tags: DNA, cancer, lung, smoking

1967

Asbestos exposure linked to lung tumors, mesotheliomas

asbestos.

Researchers linked asbestos exposure to an increased incidence of lung tumors and mesotheliomas, and found that asbestos-exposed workers who smoke cigarettes have a risk of lung cancer more than ten times as great as asbestos-exposed individuals who do not smoke.

Full Highlight: Asbestos exposure linked to lung tumors, mesotheliomas

Tags: cancer, lung, smoking

Back
to Top