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Your Environment. Your Health.

NONPERSISTENT CHEMICAL EXPOSURE, PLACENTAL DEVELOPMENT, AND MATERNAL PRE- AND POST-PREGNANCY CARDIOVASCULAR HEALTH

Export to Word (http://www.niehs.nih.gov//portfolio/index.cfm/portfolio/grantdetail/grant_number/K99ES030403/format/word)
Principal Investigator: Kahn, Linda G
Institute Receiving Award New York University School Of Medicine
Location New York, NY
Grant Number K99ES030403
Funding Organization National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
Award Funding Period 17 Apr 2019 to 31 Mar 2021
DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): PROJECT SUMMARY/ABSTRACT In the United States, increasing numbers of women are experiencing pregnancy complications such as preeclampsia, eclampsia, and gestational hypertension that can put their own and their children’s immediate and long-term health at risk. In particular, these hypertensive disorders of pregnancy are associated with increased incidence of postnatal cardiovascular disease in women. The link appears to be the placenta, an organ that both regulates nutrient flow to the developing fetus and influences maternal cardiovascular function. Nonpersistent endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), including bisphenols found in plastics and phthalates found in personal care products, have been associated with cardiovascular disease and may also be associated with placental dysfunction. Over the course of my masters, doctoral, and postdoctoral training, I have begun to develop a portfolio of published research in both environmental and reproductive epidemiology, with a particular emphasis on identifying underlying biological mechanisms. My prior education and experience positions me well to undertake my proposed K99/R00 research project: examining relations among maternal exposure to nonpersistent EDCs, biomarkers of placental dysfunction, and indicators of maternal cardiovascular disease both before and after pregnancy. This Pathway to Independence Award will provide the additional mentorship and expertise I need to transition to faculty and successfully compete for funding as a principal investigator. My training plan includes formal courses, workshops and seminars, directed readings, and apprenticeships to develop skills in 1) EDCs, environmental epidemiology, and exposure assessment, 2) advanced statistical methods, and 3) the intersection between placental and cardiovascular health. In the K99 phase of my research, I will leverage data currently being collected in the New York University (NYU) Children’s Health and Environment Study (CHES) that includes both prenatal maternal biomarker and questionnaire data as well as postnatal maternal cardiovascular measures. In the R00 phase, I will incorporate additional preconception data from the NYU Factors Influencing Reproductive Success and Time to Pregnancy (FIRST) Study. Specific Aims include 1) examining relations of maternal prenatal urinary phthalate and bisphenol levels to maternal biomarkers of placental development, and trimester-specific effects of EDCs on placental size at birth, 2) examining relations of prenatal urinary phthalate and bisphenol levels measured in three trimesters of pregnancy to maternal clinical cardiovascular risk factors at 1 and 2 years postpartum in CHES, and 3) assessing relations among maternal preconception phthalate and bisphenol exposure, preconception cardiovascular risk factors, time to pregnancy, and placental growth and development using combined CHES and FIRST data. These training and research activities will increase my expertise as an environmental epidemiologist and prepare me to successfully compete for R01 funding as an independent investigator with a focus on reproductive and women’s health.
Science Code(s)/Area of Science(s) Primary: 44 - Developmental Biology/Teratogenesis
Secondary: 03 - Carcinogenesis/Cell Transformation
Publications See publications associated with this Grant.
Program Officer Abee Boyles
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