Skip Navigation
U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Dot gov

The .gov means it’s official.
Federal government websites often end in .gov or .mil. Before sharing sensitive information, make sure you’re on a federal government site.

Https

The site is secure.
The https:// ensures that you are connecting to the official website and that any information you provide is encrypted and transmitted securely.

Your Environment. Your Health.

Publication Detail

Title: Timing of expression of the core clock gene Bmal1 influences its effects on aging and survival.

Authors: Yang, Guangrui; Chen, Lihong; Grant, Gregory R; Paschos, Georgios; Song, Wen-Liang; Musiek, Erik S; Lee, Vivian; McLoughlin, Sarah C; Grosser, Tilo; Cotsarelis, George; FitzGerald, Garret A

Published In Sci Transl Med, (2016 Feb 03)

Abstract: The absence of Bmal1, a core clock gene, results in a loss of circadian rhythms, an acceleration of aging, and a shortened life span in mice. To address the importance of circadian rhythms in the aging process, we generated conditional Bmal1 knockout mice that lacked the BMAL1 protein during adult life and found that wild-type circadian variations in wheel-running activity, heart rate, and blood pressure were abolished. Ocular abnormalities and brain astrogliosis were conserved irrespective of the timing of Bmal1 deletion. However, life span, fertility, body weight, blood glucose levels, and age-dependent arthropathy, which are altered in standard Bmal1 knockout mice, remained unaltered, whereas atherosclerosis and hair growth improved, in the conditional adult-life Bmal1 knockout mice, despite abolition of clock function. Hepatic RNA-Seq revealed that expression of oscillatory genes was dampened in the adult-life Bmal1 knockout mice, whereas overall gene expression was largely unchanged. Thus, many phenotypes in conventional Bmal1 knockout mice, hitherto attributed to disruption of circadian rhythms, reflect the loss of properties of BMAL1 that are independent of its role in the clock. These findings prompt reevaluation of the systemic consequences of disruption of the molecular clock.

PubMed ID: 26843191 Exiting the NIEHS site

MeSH Terms: ARNTL Transcription Factors/deficiency; ARNTL Transcription Factors/genetics*; ARNTL Transcription Factors/metabolism; Aging/genetics*; Animals; Atherosclerosis/genetics; Atherosclerosis/pathology; Blood Glucose/metabolism; Circadian Clocks/genetics*; Circadian Rhythm/genetics; Diet, High-Fat; Eye Abnormalities/pathology; Fertility; Gene Expression Profiling; Gene Expression Regulation*; Gliosis/pathology; Hair/growth & development; Longevity; Mice, Knockout; Phenotype; Survival Analysis; Time Factors; Transcriptome/genetics

Back
to Top