Skip Navigation
U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Dot gov

The .gov means it’s official.
Federal government websites often end in .gov or .mil. Before sharing sensitive information, make sure you’re on a federal government site.

Https

The site is secure.
The https:// ensures that you are connecting to the official website and that any information you provide is encrypted and transmitted securely.

Internet Explorer is no longer a supported browser.

This website may not display properly with Internet Explorer. For the best experience, please use a more recent browser such as the latest versions of Google Chrome, Microsoft Edge, and/or Mozilla Firefox. Thank you.

Your Environment. Your Health.

Duke University

Superfund Research Program

Functional Genomics Research Core

Project Leader: Joel N. Meyer
Grant Number: P42ES010356
Funding Period: 2005-2011

Learn More About the Grantee

Visit the grantee's eNewsletter page Visit the grantee's eNewsletter page Visit the grantee's Twitter page Visit the grantee's Facebook page

Project Summary (2005-2011)

Drs. Freedman and Kullman are developing an infrastructure that allows for the large-scale analysis of gene expression profiles. These profiles are being applied to studies of toxicogenomic responses from multiple species exposed to Superfund chemicals and their metabolites. The Functional Genomics Research Core provides research support for DNA microarray analysis to the majority of the Research Projects proposed in the Duke SBRC application. One of the aims of the FGRC is to foster inter- and intra-disciplinary research though its function as a central resource. In addition, by performing independent data analyses, which are beyond the specific aims of any individual research project, core researchers are expanding the research scope of the SBRC. The specific objectives of this Core are:

  1. Develop an infrastructure for DNA microarray experimentation that supports SBRC investigators at Duke. This includes consultation on experimental design, and performing DNA microarray processing, data analysis and data storage.
  2. Develop a support structure for the analysis of DNA microarray gene expression data. This includes developing a MIAME and MAML compliant database for the storage and analysis of DNA microarray data; providing basic data processing services; and providing resources for individual investigators to perform advanced data analysis.
  3. Facilitate interactions among Duke University SBRC investigators.

This is being accomplished by performing independent, genomic analyses of microarray data from individual SBRC projects and communicating results to all of the project investigators.

The core’s researchers are enhancing microarrays studies from individual projects by identifying and analyzing genes that are of particular interest for the studies outlined in all of the projects, and serve as a resource to facilitate collaborations among SBRC investigators.

Back
to Top