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Your Environment. Your Health.

Progress Reports: University of California-Davis: Optimizing Bioremediation for Risk Reduction Using Integrated Bioassay, Non-Target Analysis and Genomic Mining Techniques

Superfund Research Program

Optimizing Bioremediation for Risk Reduction Using Integrated Bioassay, Non-Target Analysis and Genomic Mining Techniques

Project Leader: Thomas Michael Young
Co-Investigator: Frank J. Loge
Grant Number: P42ES004699
Funding Period: 2017-2022
View this project in the NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT)

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Progress Reports

Year:   2019  2018  2017 

During this funding period, Project researchers worked with the Community Engagement Core, the Bioanalytical and Statistics Core, and the Yurok Tribal Environmental Program to collect, analyze and interpret the toxicological significance of water and sediment samples collected from multiple historical lumber processing sites (now abandoned) identified as being of concern to the community. The research team also developed and reported on novel methods to identify unknown endocrine disrupting or neurotoxic compounds in treated sewage sludge and house dust. The primary bottleneck in the biodegradation pathway for atrazine, a representative triazine herbicide and groundwater contaminant, was identified and enzyme engineering efforts have begun to improve expression of the required enzyme, thereby increasing the rate of atrazine hydrolysis and flux through the degradation pathway. Reactors to be used for experiments with organisms with engineered degradation pathways were retrofit to support automated operation during this period.

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