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Progress Reports: University of Rhode Island: PFAS Compound Effects on Metabolic Abnormalities in Rodents

Superfund Research Program

PFAS Compound Effects on Metabolic Abnormalities in Rodents

Project Leader: Angela L. Slitt
Co-Investigator: Geoffrey D. Bothun
Grant Number: P42ES027706
Funding Period: 2017-2022
View this project in the NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT)

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Progress Reports

Year:   2020  2019  2018  2017 

In 2020, the Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS) Compound Effects on Metabolic Abnormalities in Rodents Project focused on the impact of maternal diet on the effects of PFOA, PFOS, and PFHxS during the gestational and lactational period, with an interest in characterizing risk for fatty liver disease and metabolic hormone levels. The research team communicated with the Exposure Assessment and Chemometrics of PFASs, Inflammation and Metabolic Changes in Children Developmentally Exposed to PFASs, and Developing Passive Samplers for the Detection and Bioaccumulation of PFASs in Water and Porewater Projects to test whether PFAS mixtures can elicit gene expression responses in human liver cells. Researchers had several publications accepted related to the project’s work, which demonstrated that PFOS, PFHxS, and PFNA exposure in mice can impact response to high fat diet feeding in mice (Pfohl 2020; Marques 2020) and shift the profile of lipids present in the blood (Pfohl 2021). For Aim 1, the team completed studies proposed in the grant and performed additional studies in human-derived liver cells to test exposure-relevant concentrations of PFAS mixtures and understand how treatment with PFAS detected in Cape Cod Community well water can shift protein expression in adipocytes. For Aim 2, the project team completed the proposed developmental PFAS exposures and have analyzed the proposed analyses. With regard to Aim 3, the project completed PFAS protein binding studies to albumin proteins using complementary biophysical techniques that provide new mechanistic insight into the binding event (Fedorenko 2020). In collaboration with the Developing Passive Samplers for the Detection and Bioaccumulation of PFASs in Water and Porewater Project, researchers have been studying how serum and liver lipid profiles change in response to PFAS exposure. The project’s work resulted in three peer-reviewed publications, with an additional two manuscripts pending revisions.

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