Skip Navigation
U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Dot gov

The .gov means it’s official.
Federal government websites often end in .gov or .mil. Before sharing sensitive information, make sure you’re on a federal government site.

Https

The site is secure.
The https:// ensures that you are connecting to the official website and that any information you provide is encrypted and transmitted securely.

Internet Explorer is no longer a supported browser.

This website may not display properly with Internet Explorer. For the best experience, please use a more recent browser such as the latest versions of Google Chrome, Microsoft Edge, and/or Mozilla Firefox. Thank you.

Your Environment. Your Health.

Progress Reports: Boston University: Early Life Exposure to Tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-Contaminated Drinking Water and Social Stressors may Interact to Increase the Risk of Substance Use Later in Life

Superfund Research Program

Early Life Exposure to Tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-Contaminated Drinking Water and Social Stressors may Interact to Increase the Risk of Substance Use Later in Life

Project Leader: Ann Aschengrau
Co-Investigators: Lisa Gallagher, Richard Saitz, Renee Boynton-Jarrett
Grant Number: P42ES007381
Funding Period: 2000-2020
View this project in the NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT)

Learn More About the Grantee

Visit the grantee's eNewsletter page Visit the grantee's eNewsletter page Visit the grantee's Twitter page View the grantee's Factsheet(377KB)

Progress Reports

Year:   2019  2018  2017  2016  2015  2014  2013  2012  2010  2009  2008  2007  2006  2005  2004  2003  2002  2001  2000 

Over the past year, Ann Aschengrau, Sc.D. and her research team completed identifying the study population which now includes 763 birth defect cases, 299 stillbirth cases and 803 controls from 28 cities and towns in Massachusetts and Rhode Island; finding current addresses and telephone numbers for identified participants; and sending self-administered questionnaires to successfully located living subjects. To date, 421 questionnaires have been received and follow-up letters and calls to non-respondents are underway. The research team anticipates that the final response rate will be 40%. The research team also completed gathering and incorporating all relevant environmental exposure data into a Geographic Information System and finalizing the PCE exposure assessment data and procedures. Using data from prior SRP investigations, Aschengrau and her research team has also prepared or published manuscripts describing the impact of early life exposure to PCE on the risk of chronic disease; the combined impact of early life exposure to PCE and maternal alcohol consumption on the risk of illicit drug use; the impact of consuming fish with high mercury levels on learning disorders and neuropsychological test performance; the impact of air pollution on infertility; and spatial analyses of mental illness. The research team also presented its research findings at the annual meetings of the Superfund Research Program and Neurobehavioral Teratology Society, a “Diversity Event” webinar sponsored by the US EPA Technology Integration and Information Branch, the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection Seminar Series, and two Boston University symposia. A brief summary of the BUSRP and Aschengrau’s research was also provided to interested study participants.

Back
to Top