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Your Environment. Your Health.

News Items: Dartmouth College

Superfund Research Program

Sources and Protracted Effects of Early Life Exposure to Arsenic and Mercury

Center Director: Celia Y. Chen
Grant Number: P42ES007373
Funding Period: 1995-2020
View this project in the NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT)

Learn More About the Grantee

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News Items List

  • New Hampshire arsenic rule builds on NIEHS-funded research
    Environmental Factor - August 2019
    New Hampshire Governor Chris Sununu signed a bill July 12 that sharply lowers the state's drinking water limit for arsenic. The new rule, informed by research and outreach efforts from NIEHS grantees at the Dartmouth College Superfund Research Program (SRP) Center, cuts the state standard in half from the federal level of 10 parts per billion (ppb) to 5 ppb.
  • Dartmouth Superfund Research Program Informs International Mercury Reduction Efforts
    SRP News Page - October 2018
    A recent article highlights key research advances and needs to inform international policy decision making related to mercury. The article, co-authored by Celia Chen, Ph.D., of the Dartmouth College Superfund Research Program (SRP) Center, emphasizes the importance of bringing together scientific information to better understand the sources of mercury, its movement through the environment, and its effects on human and ecosystem health. Chen is an internationally recognized researcher on the accumulation of metals like mercury in aquatic food webs and serves as director of the Dartmouth SRP's Research Translation Core.
  • SRP Grantees Share Findings and Resources with Stakeholders
    SRP News Page - June 2018
    Members of the Dartmouth College Superfund Research Program (SRP) Center have actively engaged community members, regulatory partners, and lawmakers by sharing research results and resources they can use. In keeping with the SRP's strong emphasis on community engagement and research translation, the Dartmouth SRP Center has taken steps to ensure its research findings are shared with stakeholders in a useful and informative manner.
  • Eight Northeast SRP Centers Convene at Regional Meeting
    SRP News Page - April 2018
    The Northeast Superfund Research Program (SRP) Meeting brought together eight SRP Centers to discuss collaborations and network. Held in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, on March 26 - 27, the meeting included scientific presentations and poster sessions.
  • Conference Helps Scientists Inform Policies Around Mercury Pollution
    SRP News Page - August 2017
    International experts on mercury met at the 13th International Conference on Mercury as a Global Pollutant (ICMGP) July 16 - 21 in Providence, Rhode Island, to discuss scientific findings and potential measures to decrease human and wildlife exposure to mercury.
  • Tabletop Water Pitcher Filter Can Effectively Remove Arsenic from Drinking Water
    SRP News Page - August 2017
    An inexpensive tabletop water pitcher can be used to remove arsenic from drinking water, according to a recent Dartmouth College SRP Center study. The research team, led by Dartmouth SRP Center Director Bruce Stanton, Ph.D., looked at five common in-home pitcher filters, ranging in price from $20 to $35 for the pitcher and $10 to $15 for replacement filters, and compared their effectiveness at removing arsenic from water.
  • Risk e-Learning Web Seminar Series on Analytical Tools and Methods a Big Success
    SRP News Page - July 2017
    In a spring 2017 three-part Risk e-Learning Web seminar series titled 'Analytical Tools and Methods,' the Superfund Research Program (SRP) highlighted groundbreaking chemical detection, measurement, and fate and transport modeling techniques developed by grantees. In total, this series attracted 1,209 live participants, 6,543 online archive views, 1,419 audio podcast downloads, and 14,596 video podcast downloads.
  • Arsenic website helps identify sources and reduce exposures
    Environmental Factor - June 2017
    A new user-friendly website provides a wealth of information on how people are exposed to arsenic and steps that they can take to reduce exposures. The Dartmouth College Superfund Research Program (SRP) developed the website Arsenic and You to inform the public and answer questions about arsenic in water, food, and other sources.
  • Northeast SRP Researchers Gather to Discuss Research and Opportunities for Collaboration
    SRP News Page - April 2017
    On April 4 and 5, SRP researchers from institutions across the northeast gathered in Boston for the Northeast Superfund Research Program (SRP) Meeting. The event was hosted by the Northeastern University PROTECT SRP Center and co-sponsored by SRP Centers from Boston University, Brown University, Columbia University, Dartmouth College, and the University of Pennsylvania.
  • SRP Grantees Present at NAS Workshop
    SRP News Page - April 2017
    Four Superfund Research Program (SRP) grantees were involved in the Advances in Causal Understanding for Human Health Risk-Based Decision Making workshop, held March 6 - 7 in Washington, D.C. The workshop explored how modern advances in bioinformatics can be incorporated into human health decision making.
  • Dartmouth SRP Project Leaders Featured in Science Magazine News Highlight
    SRP News Page - March 2017
    On February 17, 2017, Dartmouth College Superfund Research Program (SRP) Center project leader Margaret Karagas, Ph.D., spoke at a special session at the Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Attended by 60 people, including the press, the session was highlighted in a Science Magazine news feature.
  • Grantees elected to National Academy of Sciences
    Environmental Factor - June 2016
    NIEHS grantees Mary Lou Guerinot, Ph.D., from Dartmouth College, and Michael Kastan, M.D., Ph.D., of Duke University, were among 84 new members elected May 3 to the National Academy of Sciences. Academy members are elected by their peers for outstanding contributions to research.
  • Dartmouth-Sponsored Food Collaborative Convenes in Hanover
    SRP News Page - December 2015
    The Collaborative on Food with Arsenic and associated Risk and Regulation (C-FARR) gathered in Hanover, New Hampshire, November 2 to address issues related to sources of arsenic and exposure in people through the food they eat.
  • Duke symposium addresses toxicity of energy production
    Environmental Factor - December 2015
    Several scientists and grantees from NIEHS participated in the Duke University Integrated Toxicology and Environmental Health Program 2015 fall symposium Nov. 13 in Durham, North Carolina.
  • Crossing Geographic and Discipline Borders at the PBC Meeting
    SRP News Page - August 2015
    The NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP) and the Center for Global Health at the National Cancer Institute were among the cosponsors of the 16th International Conference of the Pacific Basin Consortium for Environment and Health (PBC), held August 10-13 at the University of Indonesia.
  • River Algae Affects Mercury Pollution at Superfund Site
    Research Brief - June 2015
    A new study has shown that periphyton — a community of algae, bacteria, and other natural material living on submerged surfaces — is helping to transform mercury from a Superfund site into methylmercury, a more toxic form.
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