Skip Navigation
U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Dot gov

The .gov means it’s official.
Federal government websites often end in .gov or .mil. Before sharing sensitive information, make sure you’re on a federal government site.

Https

The site is secure.
The https:// ensures that you are connecting to the official website and that any information you provide is encrypted and transmitted securely.

Internet Explorer is no longer a supported browser.

This website may not display properly with Internet Explorer. For the best experience, please use a more recent browser such as the latest versions of Google Chrome, Microsoft Edge, and/or Mozilla Firefox. Thank you.

Your Environment. Your Health.

Progress Reports: University of Arizona: Research Translation Core

Superfund Research Program

Research Translation Core

Project Leader: Monica Ramirez-Andreotta
Co-Investigators: Mark L. Brusseau, Janick F. Artiola, Raina M. Maier
Grant Number: P42ES004940
Funding Period: 2005-2020
View this project in the NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT)

Learn More About the Grantee

Visit the grantee's eNewsletter page Visit the grantee's eNewsletter page Visit the grantee's Twitter page Visit the grantee's Instagram page Visit the grantee's Facebook page Visit the grantee's Video page

Progress Reports

Year:   2018  2017  2016  2015  2014  2013  2012  2011  2010  2009  2008  2007  2006  2005 

The University of Arizona Research Translation Core (RTC) is dedicated to understanding stakeholder needs and expectations in translational efforts and to teaching these participatory approaches in formal and informal settings so that both scientists and nonscientists can overcome barriers to research translation. Through current RTC activities, Monica Ramirez-Andreotta, Ph.D., and her researchers have supported the:

  • Center for Environmentally Sustainable Mining,
  • eight well water workshops throughout Arizona,
  • local radio program-Thesis Thursdays,
  • Gardenroots: A Citizen Science Garden Project,
  • the Dewey-Humboldt Community Environmental Board, and
  • quarterly multi-organizational transdisciplinary team conference calls.

Highlights over the last year include developing a partnership with a local radio station, KXCI, 91.3 with contributions to a weekly program "Thesis Thursdays." More than 35,000 listeners tune in to KXCI, each week over the air and online. A second highlight from the last year is a request that the RTC received from the Concerned Citizens & Retired Miners Coalition in Superior, Arizona, who wanted pertinent environmental health data for educational support leading to a series of community meetings and a new partnership. Furthermore, Gardenroots: A Citizen Science Garden Project expanded into Superior, Arizona, and Nevada City, California, and presently has seven participating communities. Each community either neighbors a hazardous waste site and/or resource extraction activities. Finally, Ramirez-Andreotta received the 2019 American Association for the Advancement of Science Early Career Award for Public Engagement with Science.

Back
to Top