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Your Environment. Your Health.

Final Progress Reports: Columbia University: Research Translation Core

Superfund Research Program

Research Translation Core

Project Leader: Steven N. Chillrud
Co-Investigator: Stuart Braman (Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University)
Grant Number: P42ES010349
Funding Period: 2006-2021
View this project in the NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT)

Learn More About the Grantee

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Final Progress Reports

Year:   2020  2016  2010 

  • Collaborated with NJDOH and Hunterdon Health Care on the design, printing, and distribution of brochure on “Private well water and your baby’s health”, which is currently being distributed through the Hunterdon County network of practices as pre-printed tri-fold brochures in health care facility waiting rooms and as print-on-demand handouts available to all practices.
  • Continued testing of private wells from testing campaigns through clinics, with 156 private well samples being analyzed in 2020. Twenty-five percent of drinking water samples collected from the kitchen tap exceeded New Jersey’s arsenic MCL of 5 micrograms/L.
  • Collaborated with Hunterdon Health Care on inserting questions about drinking water source and arsenic testing history into the electronic health record questionnaires, with two goals: a) highlighting the issue for patients and their health care providers in this area with high risk for elevated arsenic levels; b) targeting free private well testing offers to those that have not tested before. The team expects patients who have been asked by their healthcare provider about whether they have tested their water for arsenic will be more likely to accept a free test of their well water. Between August 2019 and the end of December 2020, 10,787 patients have been screened on the first question and 4,622 have self-identified as having well water, with 79 percent indicating they have never tested their well for arsenic.
  • Publication of paper on leveraging healthcare communication channels for environmental health outreach in New Jersey (Flanagan 2020a).
  • Collaborated on publication focused on effectiveness of domestic well water arsenic treatment in Maine and New Jersey (Yang 2020).
  • Collaborated on manuscripts and publications on community water supply and private well data for arsenic and uranium (Nigra 2020 and works in progress).

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