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Final Progress Reports: Texas A&M University: Field Services Core

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Superfund Research Program

Field Services Core

Project Leader: Kirby C. Donnelly
Grant Number: P42ES004917
Funding Period: 2000-2008

Project-Specific Links

Final Progress Reports

Year:   2007  2004 

Collaborations between the USEPA Regional Offices and the Field Services Core of the Texas A&M Superfund Basic Research Program (SBRP) have increased during the past year.  More specifically, the SBRP has initiated two projects with Region 6 EPA to improve methods for ecological risk assessment at contaminated sites.  The first round of sampling took place at these sites in August, 2004; a second round is planned for early 2005.  During the first round, soil, surface water and sediment were collected at each site.  In addition, mosquitofish and frogs were caught for measurement of biomarkers of exposure and effect.    Preliminary results from these sites demonstrated increased concentrations of PAHs in mosquitofish.

Field studies have also been expanded at the Lower Duwamish site in Region 10.  In collaboration with the EPA site manager and dive team, appropriate locations have been selected for collection of environmental samples.  Cages were also placed at sampling stations with either coho salmon or pacific staghorn sculpin.  The fish for this portion of the study were maintained at a NOAAH facility in Mukilteo, WA.  NOAAH staff has assisted greatly in the collection and maintenance of specimens for this study.  The objective of this study is to evaluate the utility of in situ biomonitoring studies for assessing ecological risk at a contaminated site.  A second round of sampling at this site is scheduled to occur in June, 2005.   This is the approximate time when the salmon will migrate through the area.

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