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Your Environment. Your Health.

News Items: Harvard School of Public Health

Superfund Research Program

Superfund Metal Mixtures, Biomarkers and Neurodevelopment

Center Director: David C. Bellinger
Grant Number: P42ES016454
Funding Period: 2010-2014
View this project in the NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT)

Learn More About the Grantee

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News Items List

  • Study sheds light on leads neurotoxic effects
    Environmental Factor - September 2016
    Years of research show that lead can harm early brain development, but scientists know surprisingly little about how this damage occurs at the cellular level. New findings suggest that lead triggers oxidative stress, or cellular imbalance, in neural stem cells, which could damage the cells at a pivotal point in development. The new study, by Quan Lu, Ph.D., and others at the NIEHS-supported Harvard Superfund Research Program (SRP) center, was published Aug. 26 in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives.
  • Harvard SRP collaboration honored for risk communication
    Environmental Factor - February 2014
    The Kids + Chemical Safety website, supported in part by the NIEHS-funded Harvard Superfund Research Program (SRP) Research Translation Core (RTC), received the 2013 Risk Communication Award from the Alliance for Chemical Safety.  
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