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News Items: University of Alabama at Birmingham

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Superfund Research Program

Impact of Airborne Heavy Metals on Lung Disease and the Environment

Center Director: Veena Antony
Grant Number: P42ES027723
Funding Period: 2020-2025
View this project in the NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT)

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News Items List

  • SRP Trainee Event Highlights New Approaches to Engage with Communities
    SRP News Page - August 2021
    NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP) trainees from institutions across the Southeastern U.S. gathered virtually for a two-day event, Aug. 2 and 4, to discuss best practices for partnering with communities vulnerable to environmental exposures. The event was organized by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), North Carolina State University, Duke University, University of Kentucky (UK), University of Louisville, and University of Alabama at Birmingham SRP centers.
  • Researchers pinpoint molecular trigger for lung fibrosis
    Paper of the Month - June 2021
    A new NIEHS-funded study revealed a series of molecular steps that lead to severe scarring in the lungs, called idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), in response to environmental exposures. The key step involves a modified version of vimentin, a structural protein that usually maintains cellular integrity.
  • SRP Centers Expand Scope to Address COVID-19 Research Needs
    SRP News Page - December 2020
    The NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP) provided supplemental funding to four centers to expand the focus of their research to address critical knowledge gaps related to exposure to the SARS-CoV-2 virus and its disease, COVID-19. In response to the evolving nature of the COVID-19 pandemic, this funding encourages SRP researchers to address the public health crisis and its disparate effects on vulnerable populations.
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