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Your Environment. Your Health.

Final Progress Reports: Brown University: Adverse Human Health Impacts of Nanomaterials

Superfund Research Program

Adverse Human Health Impacts of Nanomaterials

Project Leader: Agnes B. Kane
Grant Number: P42ES013660
Funding Period: 2009-2021
View this project in the NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT)

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Final Progress Reports

Year:   2020  2014 

The Adverse Human Health Impacts of Nanomaterials Project and the Nanomaterial Design for Environmental Health and Safety Project developed a framework for hazard screening of 2D, sheet-like nanomaterials based on chemically-predicted degradation pathways and biodissolution in relevant media. To illustrate the practical utility of this screening framework, the team considered MnO2 nanosheets as a case study that have been shown to react with biological reductants to release potentially toxic Mn2+ ions. A toxicological study examined uptake of MnO2 nanosheets resulting in cytotoxicity and mitochondrial alterations in fish gill target cells in vitro. This study revealed that 2D MnO2 nanosheets can impair the ability of fish gill cells to respond to energy demands or prolonged stress. The Adverse Human Health Impacts of Nanomaterials Project is now complete.

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