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Your Environment. Your Health.

Research Briefs: Louisiana State University

Superfund Research Program

Environmentally Persistent Free Radicals

Center Director: Stephania A. Cormier
Grant Number: P42ES013648
Funding Period: 2009-2018 and 2020-2025
View this project in the NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT)

Learn More About the Grantee

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Research Briefs

  • 289 - Study Sheds Light on Respiratory Toxicity of EPFRs -- Dugas, Cormier
    Release Date: 01/30/2019

    A new SRP study explains how particulate matter (PM) containing environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) activate the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). AhR is known to play an important role in detecting and responding to a variety of pollutants. These findings could prove useful in understanding the underlying mechanism of diseases known to be associated with inhalation of PM, such as cardiovascular disease.

  • 226 - Environmentally Persistent Free Radicals and Their Lifetime in Ambient Fine Particulate Matter -- Dellinger, Gehling
    Release Date: 10/21/2013

    For the first time, an expansive study into the concentration and extended decay behaviors of environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) in ambient fine particulate matter revealed the ways in which EPFRs decompose in the environment. EPFRs can cause cell damage and induce an inflammatory response which can lead to a wide range of biological damage.

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