Skip Navigation
U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Dot gov

The .gov means it’s official.
Federal government websites often end in .gov or .mil. Before sharing sensitive information, make sure you’re on a federal government site.

Https

The site is secure.
The https:// ensures that you are connecting to the official website and that any information you provide is encrypted and transmitted securely.

Internet Explorer is no longer a supported browser.

This website may not display properly with Internet Explorer. For the best experience, please use a more recent browser such as the latest versions of Google Chrome, Microsoft Edge, and/or Mozilla Firefox. Thank you.

Your Environment. Your Health.

University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill

Superfund Research Program

Training Core

Project Leader: Frederic K. Pfaender
Grant Number: P42ES005948
Funding Period: 2000 - 2011

Learn More About the Grantee

Visit the grantee's eNewsletter page Visit the grantee's eNewsletter page Visit the grantee's Twitter page Visit the grantee's Video page

Project Summary (2006-2011)

The UNC Superfund Basic Research Program (SBRP) includes six research projects, two research cores, and support cores. The research components of the Program rely heavily on graduate students and postdoctoral associates. The Training Core provides the structure needed to ensure that research personnel acquire broad interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary training in the biomedical and non-biomedical sciences, as well as in practical aspects of Superfund. All of the project and core leaders in the UNC SBRP reside in the Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering in the School of Public Health. Elements of the existing interdisciplinary culture in the department are being combined with SBRP-specific training elements to provide an efficient, comprehensive, and relevant training experience for students and post-docs. The components of the Core include seminar programs, formal course work, short courses, retreats, conferences, internships, and collaborations. Trainees emerge not only with the deep understanding resulting from focus on an individual research aim, but also with a broad grounding in many aspects of Superfund and with skills in interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary approaches to understanding and protecting public health. A strong commitment to, and record of accomplishment in, the training of underrepresented groups is documented. The UNC SBRP has benefited in this regard from other established programs on campus intended to benefit underrepresented groups.

Back
to Top