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Your Environment. Your Health.

What's New

Superfund Research Program

Dawn Brewer and Annie Koempel
Trainings Help SRP Center and Partners Spread Nutrition Knowledge Across Kentucky
Outreach and Community Engagement - November 3, 2022

University of Kentucky (UK) Superfund Research Program (SRP) Center staff are teaching Kentucky residents to educate their communities about good nutrition and environmental stewardship. Staff members recently led two train-the-trainer events introducing tools and curricula for teaching adults and children.

two gloved hands holding roots of plant
Community Resilience Talk Kicks Off SRP Climate Change Webinar Series
Science Highlights - November 1, 2022

Current research on climate change and environmental health, as well as strategies to make ecosystems and communities more resilient to climate-related events, headlined the agenda of the first session of the NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP) Climate Change and Health webinar series, held Oct. 7.

Cormier, Akeem Ali, and Kim standing together
SRP, Pacific Basin Consortium Promote Health in a Changing Climate
Outreach and Community Engagement - November 1, 2022

The 19th International Conference of the Pacific Basin Consortium for Environment and Health, held Aug. 29 to Sept. 1 on Jeju Island, South Korea, brought together global experts to discuss advancing environmental health and translating scientific knowledge to action under a changing climate.

Elkin Headshot
Chemical Toxicant Contributes to Low Birth Weight, Can Damage Placenta
Grantee Spotlights - November 1, 2022

During an NIEHS lecture Oct. 6, Elana Elkin, Ph.D., a former NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP) trainee and recipient of the 2019 Karen Wetterhahn Award, described how a chemical called trichloroethylene (TCE) can interfere with fetal development in the womb.

Danielle Carlin, Ph.D.
Role of Complex Exposures in Breast Cancer Highlighted During Workshop
Science Highlights - October 1, 2022

Current breast cancer research and efforts to evaluate how combined exposures can influence the disease were discussed during an NIEHS-led event Aug. 24-25.

Paper of the Month or Year
Extramural Paper of the Month: Link Between Exposure to Wildfire Smoke and Cardiovascular Harm Revealed
Paper of the Month - October 1, 2022

Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill SRP Center uncovered the biological mechanisms by which exposure to wildfire smoke harms the heart and lungs in mice. Wildfires are growing in intensity and frequency, posing a threat to public health worldwide. Although evidence links wildfire exposure with cardiopulmonary effects, the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown.

Paper of the Month or Year
Extramural Paper of the Moth: Triclosan Can Be Passed Through Milk, Increase Risk of Liver Disease
Paper of the Month - October 1, 2022

Researchers funded by NIEHS found that newborn mice can be exposed to the antibacterial chemical triclosan through breastmilk, leading to increased liver disease risk. According to the authors, these findings are relevant because liver disease in children is escalating in the U.S., with a limited mechanistic understanding.

Top row, from left: Avinash Kumar, Ph.D., and Rebecca Dickman. Middle row, from left: Martine Mathieu, Charlotte Wirth, and Laura Dean, Ph.D. Bottom row, from left: Melissa Woodward and Francisco Leniz
Superfund Research Program Trainees Win Prestigious K.C. Donnelly Awards
Grantee Spotlights - October 1, 2022

Seven trainees with the NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP) have earned K.C. Donnelly Externship Award Supplements. Named for longtime SRP grantee Kirby “K.C.” Donnelly, the funding enables graduate students and postdoctoral researchers to learn techniques relevant to their work from experts at outside institutions.

U.S. map highlighting the location of each of the 8 returning P42 SRP centers.
SRP Welcomes New and Returning Multiproject Centers
Grantee Spotlights - September 27, 2022

The NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP) welcomes 11 new and returning multiproject centers.

Kirsten Reid and Anna Kremer
SRP Summer Interns Shine at NIEHS Poster Competition
Grantee Spotlights - September 20, 2022

SRP summer interns Anna Kremer and Kirsten Reid presented their summer research projects in a virtual poster showcase along with interns and trainees from across NIEHS on July 28.

Andres Cardenas, Ph.D., head shot
Combining Biostatics and Genomics Research to Prevent Disease
Grantee Spotlights - September 9, 2022

Andres Cardenas, Ph.D., of the University of California (UC), Berkeley SRP Center explained how is applying his epigenetics expertise to investigate how environmental exposures contribute to the development of diseases, and how to prevent them.

Two hands, under the sink
Exposure to Antibacterial Chemical Via Lactation Linked to Liver Damage in Newborn Mice
Science Highlights - September 8, 2022

Funded by SRP, a study by researchers at the University of California, San Diego found evidence that newborn mice can be exposed to the antibacterial chemical triclosan during lactation, resulting in significant fat build up in their liver — an early sign of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

Susie Dai, Ph.D., head shot
Plant-Based Material Can Remediate PFAS, New Research Suggests
Science Highlights - September 6, 2022

A novel technology that can efficiently bind to and break down per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in the environment was developed by scientists at Texas A&M Agrilife Research with support from an SRP individual research grant.

Johnnye Lewis, Ph.D., head shot
Tribal Environmental Health Strengthened by Lewis and Team
Grantee Spotlights - September 5, 2022

For nearly three decades, Johnnye Lewis, Ph.D., has advanced Native American health by combining basic research, population-level studies, clear science communication, and robust partnerships with tribes.

Paper of the Month or Year
Extramural Paper of the Month: Prioritizing Understudied Compounds in Chemical Mixtures Could Offer Insight into Breast Cancer Risk
Paper of the Month - September 2, 2022

Researchers funded by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill SRP Center identified understudied chemicals that frequently occur in the same products as those linked to breast cancer.

Paper of the Month or Year
Extramural Paper of the Month: Future Flooding May Exacerbate Disparities in Exposure to Hazardous Pollution
Paper of the Month - September 1, 2022

Increased flooding from climate change in the U.S. will likely expose more people to legacy waste from former industrial sites, according to an SRP-funded study at Brown University.

SRP Director, William Suk, Ph.D. headshot
Superfund Research Program Boosts Innovation, Outreach, and Training
Outreach and Community Engagement - August 24, 2022

SRP Director William Suk, Ph.D., and Health Scientist Administrator Heather Henry, Ph.D., reflected on 35 years of SRP during a conversation with NIEHS Director Rick Woychik, Ph.D.

Man fishing with a child on the banks of a river.
Campaign Promotes Eating Safer Fish
Outreach and Community Engagement - August 17, 2022

Elizabeth Shapiro-Garza, Ph.D., director of the Community Engagement Core at the Duke University SRP Center , and Veronica Carter, with the North Carolina Coastal Federation discuss the “Stop, Check, Enjoy!,” campaign in an NIEHS podcast.

Joel Meyer, Ph.D.
Toxic Agents Can Target Mitochondria, Influence Disease, Expert Says
Grantee Spotlights - August 10, 2022

Joel Meyer, Ph.D., of the Duke University SRP Center, discussed his research into how early-life mitochondrial toxicity can affect later-life health, during his NIEHS Keystone Science Lecture.

NC Fish Forum team in front of a white board.
North Carolina Turns Research Collaboration into Action
Outreach and Community Engagement - July 18, 2022

Researchers across three SRP-funded universities and their stakeholders organized the North Carolina Fish Forum in 2019.

Three researchers in their lab at the University of Kentucky
Antiviral Membranes Boost Masks' Ability to Stop COVID
Science Highlights - July 15, 2022

Researchers at the University of Kentucky SRP Center created new membranes that can deactivate SARS-CoV-2 on contact, preventing the spread of COVID-19.

3rd National PFAS Conference attendees
PFAS Conference Supported by NIEHS Engages Key Stakeholders
Outreach and Community Engagement - July 11, 2022

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) were front and center during the 3rd National PFAS Meeting in Wilmington, North Carolina.

Paper of the Month or Year
Extramural Paper of the Month: Prenatal Exposure to Chemical Mixtures Worsens Working Memory in Adolescents
Paper of the Month - July 8, 2022

Prenatal exposure to chemical mixtures worsens working memory in adolescents, according to research by the Harvard School of Public Health SRP Center.

Karlatta Chief, adorned in Native American jewelery with a smile
Partnering with Tribal Communities to Protect Water from Pollution and Climate Change
Grantee Spotlights - July 1, 2022

Karletta Chief, Ph.D., of the University of Arizona SRP Center, explained how her interest in water stemmed from growing up within Navajo nation.

Graphic with lock and internet symbol representing cybersecurity
SRP Centers Deliver Data Science Trainings
Outreach and Community Engagement - June 17, 2022

NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP) grantees developed publicly available courses to help their trainees and the broader environmental health sciences research community develop data science skills.

Paper of the Month or Year
Extramural Paper of the Month: Link Between Placenta and Fetal Brain May Predict Neurodevelopment Disorders
Paper of the Month - May 19, 2022

An SRP-funded study in mice showed that prenatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) altered DNA methylation in both the placenta and fetal brain in a manner consistent with neurodevelopmental disorders. The research was conducted at the University of California, Davis SRP Center.

Paper of the Month or Year
Extramural Paper of the Month: Tropical Cyclones Linked to Rise in U.S. Deaths
Paper of the Month - May 19, 2022

Over the last three decades, tropical cyclones in the U.S. were associated with higher death rates in subsequent months, according to a study by the Columbia University SRP Center. The study included data on deaths in U.S. counties that experienced at least one tropical cyclone between 1988 and 2018.

Two scientists in the lab examining a yellow sample
Materials Science and Bacteria Are Key to Remediation, Experts Say
Science Highlights - May 19, 2022

During recent NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP) Progress in Research webinars, grantees discussed innovative strategies for bioremediation — the process of using bacteria, fungi, and plants to break down contaminants.

Kathleen Gray, Ph.D.
Improving Environmental Risk Communication Through Interdisciplinary Collaborations
Grantee Spotlights - May 19, 2022

Kathleen Gray, Ph.D., of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC) SRP Center talked about her passion for increasing understanding of environmental exposures in communities affected by contamination.

Cell phone next to NanoAffix device
NIEHS-Funded Technology to Detect Lead in Water Goes Commercial
Science Highlights - May 17, 2022

NanoAffix Science, LLC developed a new portable device to detect lead in tap water in real time. The team launched its first commercial device, called NanoAquaSense, at the Water Quality Association’s Annual Convention in early April. Their technology is funded through the NIEHS Small Business and Innovation Research program.

Mike Denison, Ph.D.
Remembering Mike Denison, Longtime SRP Grantee
Grantee Spotlights - May 13, 2022

Environmental toxicologist Michael (Mike) Denison, Ph.D., of the University of California (UC), Davis, who was internationally known for his fundamental research on persistent organic pollutants and for developing a widely used test for detecting toxic substances in samples, died March 22 of brain cancer. A longtime grantee of the NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP), Denison served as a project leader for more than 25 years.

Tiffany Sanchez, Ph.D.
Uncovering the Link Between Metals and Disease
Grantee Spotlights - April 19, 2022

Tiffany Sanchez, Ph.D., a former trainee at the Columbia University SRP Center, reflected on her experience as a trainee working with large cohorts, or groups of participants, to understand the connections between metal exposures and disease.

Stefano Monti, Ph.D.
Preventing Disease Through Bioinformatics
Grantee Spotlights - April 19, 2022

Stefano Monti, Ph.D., explained how he is developing computational models for environmental contaminants to predict their long-term health effects, such as cancer and metabolic disorders. Since 2012, Monti led the Bioinformatics and Molecular Modeling Core at the Boston University SRP Center.

Danielle Carlin, Ph.D.
SRP Shines at SOT
Grantee Spotlights - April 14, 2022

NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP) grantees from across the country gathered in person and virtually for the 2022 Society of Toxicology (SOT) Annual Meeting, held March 27-31 in San Diego. The meeting highlighted diverse, cutting-edge research.

Water pitcher with filter filled from the tap.
PFAS Water Filter Developed Through NIEHS Funding
Science Highlights - April 1, 2022

A new filter cartridge that is compatible with Brita pitchers can remove per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) from drinking water. The Purefast cartridges from CycloPure, Inc., are based on DEXSORB+ technology, which was developed with support from an NIEHS Superfund Research Program small business innovation research grant.

Paper of the Month or Year
Extramural Paper of the Month: Exposure to PCB Mixture Mimicking School Air Linked to Range of Health Effects
Paper of the Month - April 1, 2022

Long-term exposure to polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) mixtures in school air may affect the nervous and immune systems, according to an SRP-funded study in rats.

Paper of the Month or Year
Extramural Paper of the Month: Pine Needles Work as Passive Samplers for PFAS
Paper of the Month - April 1, 2022

North Carolina State University SRP Center researchers showed that pine needles can be used as a tool to monitor the presence and distribution of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) over time.

Paper of the Month or Year
Extramural Paper of the Month: Data Mining Study Sheds Light on Factors Contributing to Preterm Birth Disparities
Paper of the Month - April 1, 2022

Researchers at the Northeastern University SRP Center used a data mining approach to identify a diverse set of chemicals that may contribute to disparities in preterm birth among different populations.

two women at a table building a protein kit
SRP Teams Tackle Pandemic Challenges from Many Angles
Outreach and Community Engagement - March 9, 2022

Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP) teams have shown resourcefulness, updating existing projects and pursuing new research to address environmental health needs.

Veena Antony, M.D.
Advancing Environmental Justice Through Research and Outreach
Grantee Spotlights - March 4, 2022

University of Alabama at Birmingham SRP Center Director Veena Antony, M.D., described her work to improve lung health in residents near a local Superfund site.

Educational resource for  COVID-19 and arsenic exposure
Educational tool highlights COVID-19 and arsenic research
Outreach and Community Engagement - March 1, 2022

A new online educational resource invites high school students to examine ways that humans are exposed to arsenic and how exposure might influence susceptibility to COVID-19 infection. The tool was developed by the NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP) Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC).

Paper of the Month or Year
Extramural Paper of the Month: Changes in Gut, Liver may Contribute to Alzheimer’s Disease Susceptibility
Paper of the Month - March 1, 2022

Researchers at the University of Washington SRP Center determined how changes in the gut and liver may contribute to cadmium-induced Alzheimer’s disease (AD).

Paper of the Month or Year
Extramural Paper of the Month: Leveraging Unused Samples to Predict Metal Exposures
Paper of the Month - March 1, 2022

University of Iowa SRP Center researchers demonstrated a robust approach for predicting exposure to arsenic and manganese using a commonly stored but often unused biological sample. As an alternative to using whole blood, their method used only the clotted erythrocyte fraction to track metal exposures.

, Mónica Ramírez-Andreotta, Ph.D.
Building trust, sharing data: grantee promotes participatory research
Outreach and Community Engagement - March 1, 2022

During her Feb. 14 NIEHS Keystone Science Lecture, Monica Ramirez-Andreotta, Ph.D., shared the numerous ways she works with communities to integrate their priorities into environmental health sciences research. The University of Arizona SRP Center researcher directs Gardenroots and Project Harvest, which are citizen science initiatives that engage community members about the health of their soil, water, and plants.

Keri Hornbuckle, Ph.D.
Exposure to Airborne PCBs an Ongoing Challenge, Expert Says
Grantee Spotlights - March 1, 2022

Approaches for studying airborne exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls, and helping communities reduce such exposure, were discussed by University of Iowa Superfund Research Program Director Keri Hornbuckle, Ph.D., during her February 4 Keystone Science Lecture.

Celia Chen, Ph.D.
Leveraging Partners Across Disciplines and Continents
Grantee Spotlights - February 18, 2022

A feature on Dartmouth College SRP Center Director Celia Chen, Ph.D., explains how she is leveraging decades of research on Mercury to better understand how people are exposed to per and polyfluoroalkyl substances.

Mónica Ramírez-Andreotta, Ph.D.
Engaging Communities to Improve Well-being
Grantee Spotlights - February 17, 2022

Monica Ramirez-Andreotta, Ph.D., from the University of Arizona SRP Center, shared her experience engaging communities in science and her journey from SRP trainee to SRP researcher.

Elsie Sunderland, Ph.D
Complexities of PFAS Research Focus of Congressional Hearing
Grantee Spotlights - February 1, 2022

Complexities of studying per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) were shared by SRP grantees and other experts during a congressional hearing. Witnesses discussed how increased research and development can better inform regulation and strengthen methods for cleaning up PFAS in the environment.

Paper of the Month or Year
Extramural Paper of the Month: Database reveals toxic metals in private well water in NC
Paper of the Month - February 1, 2022

Leveraging two decades of well water data in North Carolina, investigators at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC) SRP Center reported residents are exposed to arsenic and lead above the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency standards.

Cherie De Vore, Ph.D.
Former SRP Trainee Featured in NIEHS Global Environmental Health Newsletter
Grantee Spotlights - February 1, 2022

Cherie De Vore, Ph.D., a former trainee with the University of New Mexico SRP Center, explained how her mechanistic research on metal contaminants in the environment is grounded in her Dine identity.

Chef Keith Rhodes
Duke Campaign Promotes Safe Fish Consumption
Outreach and Community Engagement - January 28, 2022

New fish consumption advisories in North Carolina were developed using data collected through the NIEHS Superfund SRP Center at Duke University. The goal is to better protect the health of people who collect and eat fish from the Cape Fear River.

systems approach graphic
Annual SRP Meeting Highlights Collaboration and Innovation to Address Emerging Challenges
Grantee Spotlights - January 5, 2022

The annual meeting to celebrate the 35th anniversary of the NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP) was held as an abbreviated virtual event December 16, 2021. Drawing over 400 attendees from across the U.S., the meeting highlighted how SRP's dedication to innovation and collaboration across scientific fields can tackle emerging challenges.

Paper of the Month or Year
Extramural Paper of the Month: Biosensor Characterizes Contaminants and Potential Health Risks After Disasters
Paper of the Month - January 3, 2022

A sophisticated biosensor may provide information about polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon distribution and potential toxicity in the aftermath of natural disasters, according to an SRP-funded study. By rapidly characterizing and prioritizing samples for study, the tool supports disaster research response where time and resources are limited.

Paper of the Month or Year
2021 Papers of the Year: Plant Leaves Work as Reliable Air Monitor in Citizen-Science Study
Paper of the Month - January 3, 2022

Working with citizen-scientists, University of Arizona SRP Center researchers demonstrated that leaves can be used as a low-cost, reliable method to assess the level of metals in airborne dust.

Paper of the Month or Year
Extramural Paper of the Month: Microbiome Affects Early Childhood Behavior Differently in Girls and Boys
Paper of the Month - January 3, 2022

Bacteria in the gut of young children may relate to behavioral disorders, affecting girls and boys differently, according to an SRP-funded study at the Dartmouth College SRP Center. This is one of the first studies to examine associations between the microbiome and a broad range of behavioral outcomes that may vary by sex.

Molly Frazar
Effort to remove PFAS from water earns grad student Wetterhahn Award
Grantee Spotlights - January 1, 2022

The NIEHS Superfund Research Program bestowed the honor on Molly Frazar, from the University of Kentucky.

Graphic with lock and internet symbol representing cybersecurity
Uncovering a Link Between Chemicals in Dust and Disease
Grantee Spotlights - December 17, 2021

Duke SRP Center Co-Director Heather Stapleton, Ph.D., described her research to understand the harmful chemical exposures that people may encounter in their homes and how they affect health.

SRP trainee handling alligators
Studying Alligators and Humans May Reveal How PFAS Harm the Immune System
Science Highlights - November 22, 2021

Researchers at the NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP) Center at North Carolina State University (NCSU) are exploring connections between exposure to per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) and immune function in both animals and humans. They are gaining insight into how exposure to PFAS over decades may harm the immune system and the body's ability to fight off infections, including COVID-19.

trainees clearing land with shovels on the farm
Community-engaged research addresses health concerns on tribal lands
Outreach and Community Engagement - November 4, 2021

Approximately 500,000 Native Americans live within three miles of a Superfund site. The NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP) has long supported community-engaged research with Native American communities to identify strategies to reduce exposures and protect their health. To celebrate Native American Heritage Month, this article recognizes how some SRP researchers address community concerns in Tribal lands.

Map of NH and ME with dots indicating well water sampling sites
Dartmouth SRP Center Helps Young Citizen Scientists Continue Work
Outreach and Community Engagement - October 21, 2021

Researchers at the NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP)-funded Center at Dartmouth College and collaborators quickly identified challenges and realistic solutions for their citizen science project, All About Arsenic, during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Juan Parras
Organizing Community Voices to Achieve Environmental Equity, Justice, and Resilience
Grantee Spotlights - September 29, 2021

Juan Parras described his partnership with the SRP Centers at Texas A&M University and the Baylor College of Medicine through the Texas Environmental Justice Advocacy Services (t.e.j.a.s.).

two women toting a large bucket
Brown SRP Researchers and Community Come Together on Narragansett Tribal Lands
Outreach and Community Engagement - September 28, 2021

NIEHS-funded Brown University Superfund Research Program (SRP) Center researchers and Narragansett Tribal leaders, long-time partners in community activities, joined forces again. Through their collaboration, they are educating and empowering Tribal members to address their environmental health concerns in a way that connects cultural and scientific knowledge.

Screenshots of DEBRI data showing sample participant results screens
SRP Researchers Inform PFAS Guidance
Outreach and Community Engagement - September 2, 2021

Involving the community is valuable when adjusting clinical and public health guidance, especially as it relates to the health effects of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) and other chemicals of concern.

thirteen researchers posing for a photograph in front of a farmers market with trees in the background
SRP Trainee Event Highlights New Approaches to Engage with Communities
Outreach and Community Engagement - August 19, 2021

NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP) trainees from institutions across the Southeastern U.S. gathered virtually for a two-day event, Aug. 2 and 4, to discuss best practices for partnering with communities vulnerable to environmental exposures. The event was organized by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), North Carolina State University, Duke University, University of Kentucky (UK), University of Louisville, and University of Alabama at Birmingham SRP centers.

One individual in a red jacket sitting in boat looking over the edge of the boat into a tube, three individuals in waders standing around the boat in a lake surrounded by trees
UW SRP Researchers Work with Agency Partners to Communicate Risk
Outreach and Community Engagement - August 5, 2021

Researchers from the NIEHS-funded University of Washington (UW) Superfund Research Program (SRP) Center found new evidence that environmental contamination from a former smelter in Ruston, Washington may pose a threat to human health in surrounding areas. Before publishing the results, the team reached out to coordinate risk communication strategies with agency partners and share the findings with potentially affected communities.

Brown SRP trainees, researchers, and community members take safety precautions during community volunteer days.
Trainees Get Creative During the Pandemic
Grantee Spotlights - July 21, 2021

When in-person events, classes, and research activities were put on hold due to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP)-funded trainees got creative and identified unique opportunities to pursue safely during the pandemic. With support from their mentors, SRP trainees gained experience across multiple scientific fields, conducted research in a collaborative environment, and engaged with diverse stakeholders and community members.

Four squares that read - 1) number of studies: 40; 2) number of specimens analyzed: 63,698; 3) number of subjects: 27,033; 4) Number of Chemicals Targeted: 139
HHEAR Grantee Meeting Highlights Resources for Researchers
Science Highlights - July 16, 2021

NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP)-funded researchers from all over the country tuned in for the Human Health Exposure Analysis Resource (HHEAR) June 2021 Virtual Grantee Meeting. The event was hosted by the HHEAR Coordinating Center and the NIEHS Exposure Science and the Exposome Webinar Series.

Diana Rohlman, Ph.D
Innovating Environmental Health Communication
Grantee Spotlights - June 22, 2021

Former Oregon State University (OSU) SRP Center trainee Diana Rohlman, Ph.D., discussed creative approaches for culturally sensitive community engagement and research translation.

Multiracial group of people standing in clean environment
Advancing Environmental Justice
Outreach and Community Engagement - June 9, 2021

Researchers funded by the NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP) have been in the spotlight recently for their work on environmental justice (EJ). From being selected for prestigious committees to supporting webinar series, SRP grantees and their partners are addressing the challenges and complexities of EJ.

illustration of a dna strand on a black background
Linking a DNA Repair Enzyme to Cancer Susceptibility
Science Highlights - May 10, 2021

Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP) Center uncovered a mechanism that may explain how N-Nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) can lead to DNA damage and cancer in mice.

Photograph of a plant seedling growing out of a pile of dirt on the ground
SRP Welcomes New Individual Research Grants
Science Highlights - April 27, 2021

The NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP) welcomes 10 newly funded individual research projects. They are incorporating new advances in materials science to optimize bioremediation of contaminants in soil, sediment, or water. Bioremediation is a cost-effective, energy efficient approach involving bacteria, fungi, and plants to break down and remove hazardous substances from the environment. These projects may offer new breakthroughs to advance sustainable solutions for hazardous substances in the environment.

SOT Virtual Meeting poster
SRP Impresses at Virtual SOT
Grantee Spotlights - April 19, 2021

NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP)-funded researchers from all over the country tuned in for the virtual 2021 Society of Toxicology (SOT) Annual Meeting and ToxExpo on March 16-26. More than 60 SRP project leaders and trainees from more than 13 SRP Centers gave oral and poster presentations.

drawing of a human figure in silhouette inside a circle with images of the enviromnent and scientific illustrations filling sections of the circle
SRP Grantees Share Innovative Science at Microbiome Conference
Grantee Spotlights - April 8, 2021

In an NIEHS virtual symposium, held February 23-24, NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP) grantees were well represented within the broader NIEHS community, sharing their efforts to understand the relationship between environmental exposures, the microbiome, and human health.

Angela Gutierrez, Ph.D.
Developing Innovative, Sustainable Technologies to Clean-up Water
Grantee Spotlights - April 7, 2021

Angela Gutierrez, Ph.D., of the University of Kentucky SRP Center shared her journey from SRP trainee to NIEHS small business innovative research grant to develop new strategies to remove contaminants from water.

Morello-Frosch is a professor in the School of Public Health and the Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management at the University of California (UC), Berkeley. She leads the Community Engagement Core at the UC Berkeley SRP Center. (Photo courtesy of the UC Berkeley SRP Center)
Linking Chemical and Nonchemical Mixtures to Health Disparities
Grantee Spotlights - February 5, 2021

Rachel Morello-Frosh, Ph.D., conducts research to understand how social factors, such as inequality and psychological stress, interact with environmental chemical exposures to influence disparities in the health status of different groups.

FAIR principles
Annual Meeting Satellite Workshops Boost Collaboration
Grantee Spotlights - February 1, 2021

Two workshops, held December 16 as part of the first NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP) virtual annual meeting, provided forums to delve into data science issues and showcase innovative remediation and detection technologies.

lipids
New Approach to Remove Chemicals from Animal Derived Foods
Science Highlights - January 10, 2021

In a new study, funded in part by the NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP), researchers improved an approach to remove persistent organic pollutants (POPs) from foods of animal origin. Michael Denison, Ph.D., from the University of California, Davis SRP Center collaborated with a team of researchers from the European Union Reference Laboratory to test several laboratory methods and develop an improved method for the extraction of lipids and associated POPs bound to animal tissue.

OndaVia trained a team of experts to run its water analysis system at the NIH campus. (Photo courtesy of Mark Peterman)
SRP Small Business Successfully Deploys Water Testing Technology at the NIH Campus
Science Highlights - January 6, 2021

NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP) small business grantee OndaVia, Inc. successfully implemented their water analysis system at the NIH campus in Bethesda, Maryland. The system uses spectroscopy and nanotechnology to provide instrumentation for rapid, on-site, easy to use, and inexpensive laboratory-grade testing of chemicals in water.

COVID-19
SRP Centers Expand Scope to Address COVID-19 Research Needs
Outreach and Community Engagement - December 9, 2020

The NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP) provided supplemental funding to four centers to expand the focus of their research to address critical knowledge gaps related to exposure to the SARS-CoV-2 virus and its disease, COVID-19. In response to the evolving nature of the COVID-19 pandemic, this funding encourages SRP researchers to address the public health crisis and its disparate effects on vulnerable populations.

Photograph of Mike Aitken
Remembering Mike Aitken, Esteemed SRP Scholar and Mentor
Grantee Spotlights - October 9, 2020

Michael (Mike) Aitken, Ph.D., professor emeritus of Environmental Sciences and Engineering at the University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill, passed away September 19 after a long, courageous battle with cancer. Aitken served as a project leader and integral part of the UNC Superfund Research Program (SRP) Center for more than 20 years.

Graph used to inform households of potential elevated arsenic levels in their neighborhood wells
SRP Studies Highlight Strategies to Improve Well Testing for Arsenic and Document Benefits
Science Highlights - October 1, 2020

In a pair of recent publications, researchers from the Columbia University SRP Center demonstrated a strategy to improve private well testing for arsenic. They also showed that water treatment systems effectively reduced arsenic water levels and may reduce the likelihood of developing cancer.

altered tubular networks in endothelial cells compared to control
New Approach Links Cell Studies to Human Health
Science Highlights - September 3, 2020

A new NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP)-funded study demonstrated a strategy using data from cell studies to characterize how exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) may harm human health, particularly the cardiovascular system. PCBs are a large and complex group of chemicals that often occur in mixtures and can contaminate soil, groundwater, and air.

Angela Slitt, Ph.D.
SRP Grantees Part of the Conversation on PFAS
Grantee Spotlights - September 3, 2020

A new virtual seminar series is providing an opportunity for researchers to share information on per- and poly-fluoroalkyl substances (PFAS). The first session of the series, which kicked off on July 31 and included more than 400 participants, featured Angela Slitt, Ph.D., of the NIEHS-funded University of Rhode Island Superfund Research Program Center.

Dragonfly in specimen jar
Dragonflies Provide Insight into Mercury Pollution Across U.S. National Parks
Science Highlights - August 13, 2020

A researcher from the NIEHS-funded Dartmouth College Superfund Research Program (SRP) Center contributed to the first-ever survey of mercury pollution in the U.S. National Park System. The study, built on nearly a decade of research across the country, found that immature dragonfly larvae can be used to estimate the amount of mercury that is present in local fish, amphibians, and birds.

Metals Epigenetics Symposium poster
Symposium Brings Together Metals and Epigenetics Experts
Grantee Spotlights - July 21, 2020

In a virtual symposium, NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP) grantees and colleagues shared research findings and discussed leveraging data to learn how metal exposures can lead to epigenetic changes.

Location of the Superfund site on the Lower Duwamish River.
Videos Offer Advice for Safe Fishing Along Polluted River
Outreach and Community Engagement - July 2, 2020

A new nine-part, multilingual video series delivers critical fish consumption information to Seattle communities who fish the contaminated Duwamish River for food, recreation, and cultural reasons. The video series covers a range of topics, including an introduction to salmon fishing, how much salmon is safe to eat, and how to prepare and cook various salmon dishes. To meet the needs of the area s culturally diverse fishing community, they are available in Spanish, Vietnamese, and Khmer, the official language of Cambodia.

Dora Taggart
Moving Monitoring Tools from the Lab to the Marketplace
Grantee Spotlights - June 8, 2020

NIEHS SRP small business grantee Microbial Insights is taking the next steps to commercialize its tools that monitor the break down of environmental contaminants. The company was one of 23 small businesses selected to participate in the 2020 Innovation Corps (I-Corps) at NIH, an eight-week intensive program that teaches researchers how to accelerate commercialization of their products.

REsearchers working in the River Road Testing Lab.
SRP Centers Combat COVID-19
Outreach and Community Engagement - June 1, 2020

NIEHS SRP Centers across the country are contributing their expertise to respond to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. From increasing testing capacity and improving personal protective equipment to creating online tools and outreach materials, SRP researchers are fighting COVID-19 from the local to the global level.

Artist rendering of figures progressing from childhood to adulthood
SRP Contributes to Human Health Exposure Analysis Resource, Grantees Eligible to Use Resource
Science Highlights - May 15, 2020

The NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP) contributed to the Human Health Exposure Analysis Resource (HHEAR) initiative, which provides NIH-funded researchers access to centralized, high-quality exposure assessment services. All SRP grantees are eligible to use this resource to analyze samples. The next round of applications are due June 26 and August 28, 2020.

U.S. maps showing locations of returning certers at Louisiana State University, University of Kentucky, University of Arizona, Oregon State University, University of Iowa, and Northeastern University, as wel as University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Harvard University, Baylor College of MEdicine, North CArolina State University, and University of Alabama at Birmingham.
SRP Welcomes New and Returning Multiproject Centers
Grantee Spotlights - April 24, 2020

The SRP welcomes 11 new and returning multiproject Centers. SRP Centers consist of several projects and cores, designed to address research questions that contribute to the Center's overall research focus. These NIEHS-funded grants are the mainstay of the program, where transdisciplinary teams of scientists and engineers working in different fields tackle complex but targeted problems in environmental health.

John Meeker, Sc.D
Linking Environmental Chemicals and Preterm Birth in Puerto Rico
Science Highlights - April 9, 2020

Two new studies from Northeastern University's SRP Center, Puerto Rico Testsite for Exploring Contamination Threats (PROTECT), found links between poor birth outcomes and exposure to environmental chemicals, including metals and flame retardants. Led by John Meeker, Sc.D., and funded by NIEHS, both studies leverage the Center's PROTECT birth cohort to explore the environmental factors that contribute to preterm birth in Puerto Rico, which has one of the highest preterm birth rates in the world.

Andrew Cooper, Ph.D., collects plant tissues from a fruit tree in the community garden.
Plant Testing Informs Safe Community Gardening Practices
Outreach and Community Engagement - March 20, 2020

In a new NIEHS-funded study, SRP Center researchers revealed elevated levels of heavy metals and arsenic in a local community garden grown on a Brownfields site. By installing raised garden beds on the site, they found that they could grow fruits and vegetables that did not accumulate contaminants.

HGBEnviroScreen
New Tool Combines Exposure Data to Identify Vulnerable Communities
Outreach and Community Engagement - March 12, 2020

A new online tool combines environmental and health data to identify communities vulnerable to negative effects of environmental exposures and other stressors in the Houston region. The tool, developed by the Texas A&M Superfund Research Program Center in close partnership with the Environmental Defense Fund, helps communities understand how environmental factors like flooding and air pollution can affect their health.

Dibakar Bhattacharyya and Lindell Ormsbee
New Membrane Technologies Clean Up Contaminated Water
Science Highlights - February 28, 2020

In two recent studies, researchers at the University of Kentucky SRP Center demonstrated that they can effectively remove contaminants, including trichloroethylene and perfluorooctanoic acid, from water using specialized membranes. Led by Dibakar Bhattacharyya, Ph.D., the research team developed functional membranes that can both trap and degrade contaminants.

Philippe Grandjean
Early-Life PFAS Exposure May Affect Childhood Metabolism
Science Highlights - January 28, 2020

Exposure to perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) during prenatal and early childhood periods could alter metabolic hormones in children, according to a study from the University of Rhode Island Superfund Research Program (SRP) Center. The researchers found that with increased early-life exposure to PFAS, adipokine hormone levels during childhood decreased. Adipokines are a family of hormones thought to play a key role in energy metabolism.

New Video Series Spotlights PFAS
New Video Series Spotlights PFAS
Outreach and Community Engagement - December 12, 2019

In an eight-part video series, Silent Chemicals, Loud Science, researchers at the University of Rhode Island Superfund Research Program Center (URI SRP Center), funded by NIEHS, share important information about per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS). PFAS are commonly used in consumer products and firefighting foams and can accumulate in the environment.

Bill Suk, Prarthana Shankar, Zunwei Chen, and Shuai Xie
2019 Annual Meeting Celebrates Trainees
Grantee Spotlights - December 11, 2019

The Superfund Research Program (SRP) Annual Meeting, held November 18 – 20 in Seattle, brought together SRP researchers, trainees, administrators, and partners to share findings and discuss research and training. The meeting centered on "Data to Knowledge to Action" and emphasized how fundamental research has stimulated knowledge translation, training, and prevention and intervention activities. SRP is a program of NIEHS.

Kelly Ferguson, Ph.D., and John Meeker, Sc.D.
Collaboration Between NIEHS and SRP Center Finds Phthalates May Contribute to Preterm Births
Science Highlights - November 25, 2019

Puerto Rico does not just have one of the highest preterm birth rates in the United States, it has one of the highest preterm birth rates in the world. Researchers from Northeastern University's Puerto Rico Testsite for Exploring Contamination Threats (PROTECT) Superfund Research Program (SRP) Center, a multi-institution collaboration, may be a step closer to understanding why.

Pacific Basin Consortium participants
PBC Meeting Strengthens International Environmental Health Network
Outreach and Community Engagement - October 31, 2019

NIEHS staff and grantees shared their expertise and discussed ways to address pressing environmental health issues at the Pacific Basin Consortium (PBC) conference, September 15 -19 in Kyoto, Japan.

Findable, Accessible, Reusable, Interoperable, Accelerating the Pace of Research
Supplements Expand SRP's Capacity for Data Sharing
Science Highlights - October 23, 2019

The Superfund Research Program (SRP) awarded administrative supplements to its Multiproject Center (P42) and Individual Research (R01) grantees to expand data integration, interoperability, and reuse. The SRP encourages data sharing among its grantees to accelerate new discoveries, stimulate new collaborations, and increase scientific transparency and rigor.

Artistic rendering of graphene
Blocking Mosquitoes with a Graphene Shield
Science Highlights - September 11, 2019

An innovative graphene-based film helps shield people from disease-carrying mosquitoes, according to a new study. The research, conducted by the Brown University Superfund Research Program (SRP) Center, was published August 26 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Jitka Becanova, Ph.D., standing in front of her poster
SRP Presented New Research at PFAS Meeting
Grantee Spotlights - September 9, 2019

Superfund Research Program (SRP) grantees from around the country gathered August 12 - 15 to discuss per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) at the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry's North America Focused Topic Meeting in Durham, North Carolina.

Site-adapted community at contaminated site, high-throughput sequencing and analyses, targeted culture designed for precision bioaugmentation, and community capable of enhanced biodegradation
Modifying Microbes to Reduce Soil Contamination
Science Highlights - September 3, 2019

Microbes in soil can break down just about anything from fallen leaves to harmful contaminants, with the right combination of species. The Duke University Superfund Research Program (SRP) Center identifies which microbial communities in soils can enhance degradation of contaminants.

Joseph Braun, Ph.D.,
Childhood Exposure to PFAS May Change Metabolism
Science Highlights - August 6, 2019

A study led by Joseph Braun, Ph.D., at the Brown University Superfund Research Program (SRP) Center, explains how per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) alter biological pathways involved in metabolism. PFAS are a group of man-made chemicals that persist in the environment and are used in firefighting foam, cookware coatings, carpets, and upholstery.

Dean Neff, Keith Rhodes, Madi Polera, and Catherine Kastleman
North Carolina Coastal Community Enjoys Fish Smart Celebration
Outreach and Community Engagement - July 24, 2019

At the Fish Smart Celebration, the Duke Superfund Research Program (SRP) Center team worked to protect the health of subsistence fishers who cast their lines in the Cape Fear River in Wilmington, North Carolina. The May event, held in partnership with Cape Fear River Watch, was part of the Center's "Stop, Check, Enjoy" campaign.

UK SRP Center Booth
SRP Trainees Talk Science at 2019 Expanding Your Horizons Conference
Outreach and Community Engagement - July 23, 2019

The University of Kentucky Superfund Research Program (UK SRP) Center showcased its work at Kentucky's third annual Expanding Your Horizons Conference on April 20. Middle school girls from across the state attended the all-day event. The goal was to inspire young girls to pursue science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) careers.

tribal youth
OSU SRP Connects Tribal Youth to Science on Campus
Outreach and Community Engagement - July 18, 2019

The Oregon State University (OSU) Superfund Research Program (SRP) Center hosted high school students from tribal nations for its third annual Tribal Youth Campus Tour. During the two-day learning exchange, tribal youth from the Columbia River region learned about SRP research, environmental health, and career opportunities in science, technology, engineering, and math.

Researchers at the University of New Mexico study how dust from abandoned uranium mines travels in the environment and affects human health.
SRP Research Highlighted at Drought Summit
Grantee Spotlights - July 16, 2019

Danielle Carlin, Ph.D., program administrator with the Superfund Research Program (SRP), presented drought-related research from SRP Centers during the National Drought & Public Health Summit in Atlanta, Georgia, June 17.

Philippe Grandjean, M.D., Ph.D., and Rainer Lohmann, Ph.D.,
Second National PFAS Conference Held in Boston
Outreach and Community Engagement - July 15, 2019

The 2019 Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS): Second National Conference, held June 10 - 12 at Northeastern University in Boston, brought researchers from diverse disciplines together to discuss cutting-edge PFAS research and strategies to protect human health.

male reproductive toxicity
Key Characteristics Help Researchers Understand Male Reproductive Toxicants
Science Highlights - June 28, 2019

New research from the University of California, Berkeley Superfund Research Program (UC Berkeley SRP) Center identifies a set of eight key characteristics for male reproductive toxicants (MRTs) - chemicals that cause negative effects on the male reproductive system. Key characteristics explain the actions of certain chemicals inside the body.

Silicone Wristbands
Silicone Wristbands Identify Common Exposures Across Continents
Science Highlights - June 27, 2019

In a new study, funded in part by the Oregon State University Superfund Research Program (SRP) Center, researchers identified common chemical exposure trends in 14 communities across three continents. The researchers, led by Kim Anderson, Ph.D., used silicone wristbands that capture personal exposures to investigate differences and trends in chemical mixtures in North America, South America, and Africa.

Ivan Rusyn, Ph.D.
Rusyn Receives Inaugural University Professorship, Names it After K.C. Donnelly
Grantee Spotlights - June 19, 2019

Ivan Rusyn, Ph.D., director of the Texas A&M University (TAMU) Superfund Research Program (SRP) Center, became one of the first five TAMU faculty members to be awarded the title of University Professor. This honor recognizes scholars who have demonstrated significant accomplishments in their field. Rusyn specializes in analyzing the combined effects of multiple chemicals on human health and leads the TAMU SRP Center, which focuses on addressing exposure to mixtures during environmental emergency-related contamination events.

TAMU SRP trainees
TAMU SRP Trainees Receive Valuable Training
Outreach and Community Engagement - June 13, 2019

Ten Texas A&M University (TAMU) Superfund Research Program (SRP) Center trainees are now more prepared to respond in a safe manner during an emergency. The trainees, along with Garett Sansom, Ph.D., Community Engagement Core member, each earned their 40-hour Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response (HAZWOPER) certification this May.

Sara Hearon, Tim Phillips, and Meichen Wang
Technology to Reduce Harmful Exposures after Disasters Goes Commercial
Science Highlights - June 6, 2019

Researchers at the Texas A&M University (TAMU) Superfund Research Program (SRP) Center have developed a new technology that can bind to hazardous chemicals in the body after exposure, reducing their uptake in the body. This technology, known as broad acting enterosorbent materials, can be added to food or water to reduce exposure to harmful mixtures of contaminants following natural disasters and other emergencies. It has been patented and granted a worldwide exclusive license to Texas EnteroSorbents, Inc. for commercialization.

Steven Chow, Michelle Lorah, Edward Bouwer, and Heather Henry
SRP Represents at International Battelle Symposium
Grantee Spotlights - June 5, 2019

Superfund Research Program (SRP) researchers were on hand at the Battelle Fifth International Symposium on Bioremediation and Sustainable Environmental Technologies to discuss advances in green and sustainable approaches to clean up hazardous waste sites. The conference provided a forum for sharing research results, practical experiences, and opportunities in the field, including advances in bioremediation, or the cleanup of contaminants using microorganisms.

Map of National Priorities List (NPL) Sites
EPA Adds Seven Hazardous Waste Sites to the National Priorities List
Outreach and Community Engagement - June 4, 2019

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently announced that it added seven hazardous waste sites to the National Priorities List (NPL) of Superfund sites. The added sites in California, Indiana, Michigan, Missouri, New York, Puerto Rico, and West Virginia include former mine, steel, metal finishing, and landfill sites.

Soil Inversion and Increased Rice Yield
Inverting Soil Decreases Arsenic and Improves Rice Yields
Science Highlights - May 29, 2019

By exchanging high-arsenic soil at the surface with deeper low-arsenic soil, researchers from the Columbia University Superfund Research Program (SRP) have demonstrated increased rice crop yields in Bangladesh. This approach, called soil inversion, increased rice yields 15 - 30 percent compared to plots that were not inverted. The team, led by Alexander van Geen, Ph.D., also reported that arsenic concentrations remained lower over four seasons of monitoring.

Breakout Group
NC Fish Forum Brings Partners Together to Improve Fish Consumption Advisories
Outreach and Community Engagement - May 3, 2019

On March 21, the Duke University Superfund Research Program (SRP) Center convened stakeholders from across North Carolina in Raleigh to discuss fish consumption advisories and how to improve the process to best protect public health. NC Fish Forum attendees focused on known risks like mercury, as well as emerging contaminants such as per- and polyfluorinated compounds.

Jerry Schnoor, Ph.D
Jerry Schnoor Receives 2019 ACS Award for Innovative Plant-Based Cleanup Advances
Grantee Spotlights - May 2, 2019

Jerry Schnoor, Ph.D., a University of Iowa Superfund Research Program (SRP) Center project leader, received the American Chemical Society (ACS) Award for Creative Advances in Environmental Science and Technology during the ACS Spring 2019 National Meeting, held March 31 - April 4 in Orlando, Florida.

Jennifer Horney
Translating Research to Assessments and Planning for a Changing Climate
Outreach and Community Engagement - April 24, 2019

Two Texas A&M University (TAMU) Superfund Research Program (SRP) Center projects are translating their research to help communities facing impacts and health risks from climate-related disasters, such as wildfires and flooding. These projects are improving community assessments and resilience planning in areas facing these challenges.

Heat map showing risk of PFAS contamination in Rhode Island
Brown SRP Database Helps Identify Areas of Toxic Waste Contamination
Outreach and Community Engagement - April 19, 2019

Researchers from the Brown University Superfund Research Program (SRP) Center designed a geospatial tool and database to map and identify areas in Rhode Island that are likely to be contaminated with toxic waste.

Stephanie Eick
Socioeconomic Status Contributes to Arsenic-related Diabetes Risk
Science Highlights - April 17, 2019

A new Superfund Research Program (SRP) study showed that arsenic-exposed Chileans with lower socioeconomic status (SES) were more likely to develop diabetes than those with higher SES. According to the authors, these results suggest that low SES individuals may be more vulnerable to some of the harmful effects of arsenic exposure, such as type 2 diabetes.

CycloPure, Inc.
SRP-Funded Small Business Gears Up to Hit the Shelves
Science Highlights - April 12, 2019

CycloPure, Inc., a small business funded by the Superfund Research Program (SRP), has announced a major advance in its cost-effective water filtration technology called DEXSORB. Its new product, DEXSORB+, works to rapidly remove per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) from contaminated water supplies. PFAS, which have been used in consumer products and aqueous film-forming foams at airports, military installations, and firefighting training sites, do not break down and can accumulate in the environment.

Henry, right, stops to take a photo with Boston SRP Center project leader Jennifer Schlezinger, Ph.D., left, and Boston SRP Center trainee and Wetterhahn Award winner Stephanie Kim, center.
SRP Research Shines at SOT
Science Highlights - April 10, 2019

Superfund Research Program (SRP) grantees from all over the country gathered in Baltimore, Maryland, for the 2019 Society of Toxicology (SOT) Annual Meeting on March 10 – 14. Grantees and staff gave talks and presented posters highlighting SRP-funded research advances in toxicology.

Master plan for the Sunnyside community
Economic Benefits of Green Infrastructure for Vacant Lands
Science Highlights - March 29, 2019

A recent study at the Texas A&M University (TAMU) Superfund Research Program (SRP) Center suggests that installing green infrastructure features, such as water-absorbing rain gardens, on vacant lands can provide ecological and economic benefits, particularly in communities with frequent flooding.

Flaxseeds
Component of Flaxseed Helps Protect Heart Function in Septic Mice
Science Highlights - March 21, 2019

A novel synthetic compound made from flaxseed can protect heart function in mice with sepsis, according to new research in collaboration with the University of Pennsylvania (Penn) Superfund Research Program (SRP) Center. Sepsis is an inflammatory condition that develops in response to infection and can lead to heart failure and death.

Dividing Cells
How High-Fat Diets Drive Colorectal Cancer Growth
Science Highlights - March 19, 2019

New research identifies a pathway that explains how high-fat diets can lead to colorectal cancer, a cancer that starts in the colon or rectum. The new findings may help explain why colorectal cancer rates are increasing in adults under 50 years old and open new possibilities for treating cancer.

Images of cell growth on the MicroColonyChip over time, including 40X magnification. From Cell Reports 2019 26(6):1668-1678.e4. DOI: 10.1016/j.celrep.2019.01.053
SRP Grantees Develop a Better Way to Measure Cell Survival
Science Highlights - March 18, 2019

Researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Superfund Research Program (SRP) Center recently developed a new test that rapidly measures the effect of different chemicals on cell survival. Measuring cell survival is critical for screening potentially toxic chemicals and protecting human health. The technology was developed as part of an NIEHS small business grant, with partial funding from the MIT SRP Center.

Gardiner collects water samples
STEEP Highlighted in Nature News Feature
Grantee Spotlights - February 20, 2019

University of Rhode Island Superfund Research Program (SRP) Sources, Transport, Exposure, and Effects of PFASs (STEEP) Center researchers were featured in a story in Nature about their efforts to measure poly- and perfluorinated alkyl substances (PFAS) in water and to understand their movement in the environment and impacts on human health.

Sites Unseen
In Sites Unseen, Frickel Examines Legacies of Industrial Past
Outreach and Community Engagement - February 20, 2019

In a new book, Scott Frickel, Ph.D., a professor of sociology and member of the Brown University Superfund Research Program (Brown SRP) Center, discusses the industrial past of four different cities and how their history helps us to better understand and manage potentially toxic contamination.

Monica Ramirez-Andreotta, Ph.D.
Ramirez-Andreotta Receives 2019 AAAS Early Career Award for Public Engagement with Science
Grantee Spotlights - February 14, 2019

Monica Ramirez-Andreotta, Ph.D., assistant professor in the department of soil, water, and environmental science at the University of Arizona (UA), is the winner of the 2019 Early Career Award for Public Engagement with Science, presented by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Ramirez-Andreotta is the leader of the UA Superfund Research Program (SRP) Center Research Translation Core and Training Core.

Measuring levels of particulate matter and PAHs on the Swinomish Reservation
Assessing PAH Exposure with the Swinomish Tribe
Outreach and Community Engagement - February 14, 2019

Researchers from the Oregon State University Superfund Research Program (OSU SRP) Center have collaborated with the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community (SITC) to measure potential exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The community-based participatory research project engaged residents in the research study.

Julia Brody, Ph.D.,
SRP Researchers Reflect on Sharing Research Results at PEPH Network Meeting
Outreach and Community Engagement - February 13, 2019

Environmental health science professionals came together to discuss reporting back research results at the annual NIEHS Partnerships for Environmental Public Health (PEPH) meeting, held Dec 13-14. Among the participants, members of several Superfund Research Program (SRP)-funded Centers shared their experiences and tools focused on reporting research results back to study participants. According to an NIEHS story, the meeting reflected a critical need to ensure that individuals and communities that are part of a research study have access to their data and information on what it means for their health.

Fact sheet about PFAS exposure
STEEP Gets Creative to Communicate Science
Outreach and Community Engagement - February 7, 2019

The University of Rhode Island Superfund Research Program (URI SRP) Center has produced a variety of resources to explain the potential effects of poly- and perfluorinated alkyl substances (PFASs) and ways to reduce exposure. The URI SRP Sources, Transport, Exposure, and Effects of PFASs (STEEP) Center is addressing the emerging and expanding problem of PFAS contamination.

Robert Wright speaking to an audience.
SRP Researchers Share Findings at Exposome Conference
Grantee Spotlights - January 28, 2019

Current and former Superfund Research Program (SRP) researchers described their work and learned from others as part of the New York City Exposome Symposium Nov 2 - 3. The symposium delved into innovative approaches in exposomics, the study of how the complex mix of nutritional, chemical, and social environments shapes human health throughout the lifespan.

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