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Research Briefs By Category: Biomolecular Research

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Superfund Research Program

  • 331 - Emerging PFAS Can Cause Changes in Gene Expression and Lipid Accumulation in Human Liver Cells -- Slitt
    Release Date: 07/06/2022

    New types of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) can induce significant increases in gene expression and lipid accumulation in human liver cells at lower concentrations compared to PFAS no longer in use, according to researchers funded by the NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP).

  • 321 - First-of-its-Kind Arsenic Meta-Analysis Paves the Way for Future Data Integration -- Cardenas, Gamble
    Release Date: 09/01/2021

    Researchers from NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP) centers at the University of California (UC), Berkeley and Columbia University used advanced analysis techniques to combine data from populations in Chile and Bangladesh. The purpose was to detect common DNA methylation (DNAm) signatures associated with arsenic exposure.

  • 316 - Arsenic Exposure Before Conception May Trigger Diabetes in Male Offspring -- Fry, Styblo
    Release Date: 04/07/2021

    Exposure to inorganic arsenic before conception can alter metabolic outcomes in the offspring of mice, with different effects among males and females, according to a new study. Researchers reported, for the first time, a link between changes in gene expression in parents’ reproductive cells and diabetic indicators in offspring.

  • 313 - New Model to Examine PFAS Sheds Light on Lipid Disruption Mechanisms -- Schlezinger, Webster
    Release Date: 01/13/2021

    Researchers from the Boston University (BU) Superfund Research Program (SRP) Center developed a novel study design that generated new insight on the effects of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) on cholesterol regulation in the liver. Led by Jennifer Schlezinger, Ph.D., the team also investigated the molecular mechanisms of action, focusing on effects of PFOA on the human peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (hPPARα), a transcription factor that regulates lipid homeostasis.

  • 312 - Improved Sequencing Method Leads to Advancements in Toxicology Research -- Zacharewski
    Release Date: 12/02/2020

    NIEHS-funded Superfund Research Program (SRP) scientists are employing a new RNA sequencing method to assess mechanisms of toxicity on a finer and more accessible scale. Researchers in SRP grantee Tim Zacharewski's Lab at the Michigan State University (MSU) SRP Center conducted the study.

  • 306 - Three-Dimensional Cell Model Enhances DNA Damage Testing -- Engelward
    Release Date: 06/03/2020

    Superfund Research Program (SRP) Center scientists developed a new platform, known as the SpheroidChip analysis method, to rapidly test for DNA damage in three-dimensional (3D) cell models. Development was led by Bevin Engelward, Sc.D., at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

  • 301 - Cadmium Exposure Impairs Production of Neurons Responsible for Learning and Memory -- Xia
    Release Date: 01/08/2020

    A new study funded by the Superfund Research Program (SRP) shows cadmium exposure can impair new neurons from forming and maturing in the hippocampus region of the brain. Led by Zhengui Xia, Ph.D., the researchers at the University of Washington (UW) SRP Center also found that cadmium can lead to the death of stem cells that produce these neurons. In people, learning and memory formation depends on the production of new neurons in this region of the brain.

  • 293 - Study Sheds Light on Breakdown of PCBs to Potentially Harmful Metabolites in Humans -- Lehmler
    Release Date: 05/01/2019

    New research out of the University of Iowa Superfund Research Program (SRP) Center identified specific cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes and underlying mechanisms involved in the breakdown, or metabolism, of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) into compounds that may be more toxic.

  • 289 - Study Sheds Light on Respiratory Toxicity of EPFRs -- Dugas, Cormier
    Release Date: 01/30/2019

    A new SRP study explains how particulate matter (PM) containing environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) activate the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). AhR is known to play an important role in detecting and responding to a variety of pollutants. These findings could prove useful in understanding the underlying mechanism of diseases known to be associated with inhalation of PM, such as cardiovascular disease.

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