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Your Environment. Your Health.

University of California-Davis

Superfund Research Program

Community Engagement Core

Project Leader: Elizabeth Rose Middleton
Grant Number: P42ES004699
Funding Period: 2017-2022
View this project in the NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT)

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Project Summary (2017-2022)

The Community Engagement Core (CEC) facilitates the bidirectional exchange of knowledge between community-based and university-based scientists and researchers on environmental contamination and exposure pathways. As the hub for the partnership between the Yurok Tribe and UC Davis, the CEC works to identify community concerns and needs, facilitate response to those needs by working with the other project and core leaders, and ensure that the Tribe is able to engage with and participate in all projects of interest associated with the SRP.

The expected outcomes of the CEC's activities are:

  1. Tribal staff members trained in specific technologies for identifying specific contaminants and monitoring exposure pathways for those contaminants;
  2. Development of educational brochures and pamphlets for tribal members on specific contaminants;
  3. Technology transfer of specific tools to tribal staff and members to identify and monitor contaminants;
  4. A cadre of university researchers trained to better work with tribes;
  5. The collaborative acquisition of information on previously undocumented contaminants in the region;
  6. Provision of specific information on contaminants to support the Tribe's development of a pesticide ordinance and other specific policies, as needed by the Tribe.

 

The process of the CEC begins with relationship building, leads to collaborative science, and concludes with benefits to both partners and the environment.

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