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Your Environment. Your Health.

University of Arizona

Superfund Research Program

Outreach to the Southwestern Hispanic Communities

Project Leader: James A. Field
Co-Investigator: Denise Moreno Ramirez
Grant Number: P42ES004940
Funding Period: 2005-2025

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Project Summary (2005-2010)

The mission of the Outreach Core is to apply the knowledge gained from the SBRP program to human capacity building. Education and training in toxicology, risk assessment, and remediation are being targeted to the Hispanic Community in the Southwestern U.S. and neighboring Mexico. The core’s long-term goal is to empower the Hispanic Community with skills and expertise to tackle the health and environmental challenges plaguing the U.S.-Mexico Border region. The primary objective of the Outreach Program is to provide training, education, and teaching tools in Spanish as well as to strengthen partnerships with Mexican Universities and Research Institutes to create a functional and permanent Binational consortium dealing with border environmental health issues. To meet this objective, the Outreach Core is: 

  1. Developing online educational material in Spanish for risk assessment, hazardous waste management, and remediation;
  2. Providing workshops and semester exchange programs for US Hispanic Communities and Mexico;
  3. Developing collaborative "learning laboratories" at remediation sites to train US and Mexican students;
  4. Assisting in implementing a US-Mexico Binational Center for Environmental Sciences and Toxicology. This Core is greatly strengthening the ability of the US and Mexico to jointly address common hazardous waste problems
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