Skip Navigation
U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Dot gov

The .gov means it’s official.
Federal government websites often end in .gov or .mil. Before sharing sensitive information, make sure you’re on a federal government site.

Https

The site is secure.
The https:// ensures that you are connecting to the official website and that any information you provide is encrypted and transmitted securely.

Internet Explorer is no longer a supported browser.

This website may not display properly with Internet Explorer. For the best experience, please use a more recent browser such as the latest versions of Google Chrome, Microsoft Edge, and/or Mozilla Firefox. Thank you.

COVID-19 is an emerging, rapidly evolving situation.

Get the latest public health information from CDC: https://www.coronavirus.gov

Get the latest research information from NIH: https://www.nih.gov/coronavirus

Your Environment. Your Health.

University of Arizona

Superfund Research Program

Gene Enhanced Remediation of Co-Contaminated Soils

Project Leaders: Christopher G. Rensing, Ian L. Pepper
Grant Number: P42ES004940
Funding Period: 1995-2005

Learn More About the Grantee

Visit the grantee's eNewsletter page Visit the grantee's eNewsletter page Visit the grantee's Twitter page Visit the grantee's Instagram page Visit the grantee's Video page

Project Summary (2000-2005)

The overall objective of this project is to evaluate in situ gene delivery as a mechanism to enhance remediation of co-contaminated soils. In this study the investigators are evaluating the influence of gene transfer to indigenous soil bacteria in two ways. First, through the addition of bacterial cells which will allow for gene transfer through conjugation. Second, "naked" DNA will be added which will allow for gene transfer through transformation. These approaches will allow for the influence of both culturable transconjugants and transformants on metal bioavailability and organic degradation to be evaluated. In addition, the analysis of community DNA will allow for the influence of total transconjugants and transformants (including nonculturable ones) on metal bioavailability and organic degradation to be evaluated. These studies are particularly relevant to the goals of the Superfund program, since it will allow remediation of sites contaminated with mixed wastes. The studies are also important because the technologies developed allow for in situ treatment of contaminated sites - a strategy that is much more economically feasible than ex situ treatment.

Back
to Top