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Your Environment. Your Health.

University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill

Superfund Research Program

Stochastic Analysis of Flow and Transport Phenomena

Project Leader: George Christakos
Grant Number: P42ES005948
Funding Period: 1995 - 2006

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Project Summary (1995-2000)

The aim of this project is to provide more meaningful estimates of human and ecological exposure to contaminants that take into account the uncertainties and variabilities of groundwater flow and reactive contaminant transport. Given the significant know-how obtained in the previous years regarding the incorporation of physical variables and groundwater models in stochastic carcinogenesis, continuing research is focusing along four main directions. These include use and extension of successful flow and transport model solving approaches including diagrammatic perturbation analysis and space transformation methods, improvement of the previously developed space/time modeling and mapping techniques, use of stochastic space/time analysis to solve the inverse problem of space/time flow and transport systems, and integration of the various research directions into a unified framework leading to the development of public domain computer codes.

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