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Harvard School of Public Health

Superfund Research Program

Research Translation Core

Project Leader: Joel Schwartz
Co-Investigator: Katherine E. von Stackelberg
Grant Number: P42ES016454
Funding Period: 2010-2015
View this project in the NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT)

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Project Summary (2010-2014)

The goal of the Research Translation Core is to actively communicate important research findings emanating from the program in the manner most appropriate for the intended audience, with the goal of ensuring the accurate and timely use of data. The Research Translation Core is organized through the Harvard Center for Risk Analysis (HCRA). HCRA, founded in 1989, has always enjoyed extensive collaboration with and support from regulatory agencies, corporations, interest groups, and colleagues at many universities in the US and abroad, and provides an existing base from which to interpret and disseminate research results to a variety of stakeholders and technical audiences. Much of the integration across specific projects and cores is accomplished through HCRA's demonstrated ability to synthesize and interpret research results in terms of relevance to risk-based environmental decision-making. Researchers evaluate and synthesize the results of the specific projects and cores in terms of the implications for risk assessment and subsequent decision making and policy development using case studies and examples for dissemination through HCRA-led publications, conferences, seminars, workshops, and the SBRP and HCRA websites, as well as through community outreach programs.

Potential neurodevelopmental risks as a result of exposure to mixtures of arsenic, manganese, and lead in the environment depend on the mobility and bioavailability of the constituents under different environmental conditions as well as potential genetic susceptibility of exposed populations. The Research Translation Core, through the use of case studies and focused integrative analyses, will demonstrate and communicate the public health implications of changes in bioavailability on exposure, genetic susceptibility relative to population risks, and potential biomarkers of exposure and effect to facilitate risk assessment.

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