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Your Environment. Your Health.

University of California-San Diego

Superfund Research Program

Multiscale Imaging and Proteomics Core

Project Leader: Mark H. Ellisman
Co-Investigators: Elizabeth A. Komives, Roger Y. Tsien
Grant Number: P42ES010337
Funding Period: 2005-2017
View this project in the NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT)

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Project Summary (2011-2017)

The Multiscale Imaging and Proteomics Core provides imaging of live animals, tissues, cells, and macromolecules coupled with protein characterization and quantitation services. The Core encompasses three umbrella technology thrusts:

  1. Advanced multiscale imaging technology (headed by Dr. Ellisman).
  2. Fluorescent reporters, indicators, and labels to monitor physiological and biochemical processes (headed by Dr. Tsien).
  3. Protein identification and quantitative proteomics (headed by Dr. Komives).

This facility leverages the instrumentation and expertise of the National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research (NCMIR) and the Biomolecular and Proteomics Mass Spectrometry Facility. These resources have been used to investigate the molecular mechanisms and the development of models that can be implemented to study the effects of exposure to superfund toxicants. The NCMIR is an NIH-supported National Biotechnology Research and Development Site, supported by NIH/NCRR and NIEHS. The NCMIR houses versatile, cutting-edge imaging technologies, including state-of-the-art computer workstations and digital display facilitates, enabling research projects to employ the most sophisticated and up-to-date imaging modalities. The collaboration between Dr. Tsien's and Dr. Ellisman's groups continues to develop and refine biological reagents and tools useful for molecular detection and monitoring of intracellular interactions. The Biomolecular and Proteomics facility has a long history of supporting SRP researchers particularly in the areas of LC/MSMS quantitation. It has expanded capabilities to include identification and quantitation (using ITRAQ) of large numbers of proteins and their post-translational modifications from complex mixtures. These imaging and proteomic technologies require expensive instrumentation, are constantly evolving and are practiced by highly specialized personnel. The Multiscale Imaging and Proteomics Core is vital to the UC-SD Center in two respects:

  1. It provides advanced technology that enables sophisticated scientific imaging, protein analysis and data management at the frontiers of interdisciplinary work.
  2. It provides the capacity for the sharing of knowledge through science communication (e.g.. Dr. Karin's work and the March 2010 cover of Science showing the power of electron microscopy), which will help our Research Translation Core and Community Engagement Core meet its aims.

 

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